Metro participates in Taste of Soul

More than 1,000 people pledged to “Eat, Shop, Play Crenshaw” during the campaign kick off this past weekend at the ninth annual Taste of Soul festival. The campaign seeks to remind residents and visitors to the Crenshaw Corridor that local businesses are open during construction for the Creshaw/LAX Line.

Metro’s “Experience Trailer” also offered the public more information about the agency’s Project Labor Agreement policy to help low-income residents get work on Metro projects. Also on hand were job coordinators for the Regional Connector project, Crenshaw/LAX Transit Corridor Constructors, as well as other smaller Project Labor Agreement contractors. Metro’s information table featured members of Metro’s African American Employees Assn., as well as volunteers who welcomed to our exhibit space.

Sneak peek into the artwork for future Downtown Santa Monica Station

Artist Judithe Hernandez in her studio, with two of her original artworks for the Expo Line in the background.

Artist Judithe Hernandez in her studio, with two of her original artworks for the Expo Line in the background.

This is the fourth in a series of Source posts providing a behind-the-scenes look at the artwork fabrication process for each of the seven new Metro Rail stations under construction along the second phase of the Expo Line between Culver City and downtown Santa Monica. The artworks will create a welcoming environment for future riders and connect the stations to surrounding neighborhoods. Commissioned artists include Constance Mallinson, Shizu Saldamando, Abel Alejandre, Susan Logoreci, Nzuji de Magalhães, Carmen Argote, and Judithe Hernandez.

This post introduces the artwork of artist Judithe Hernandez, which will be featured at the Downtown Santa Monica Station. Her original artwork, L.A. Sonata, began as chalk and oil pastel drawings on paper.

Artwork Description: L.A. Sonata depicts a composite of global mythologies, a fitting gesture for the terminus station of the Expo Line, located at the very edge of our continent. The artist layers images to create metaphors for day and night as well as the seasons. By weaving cultural identifiers with elements that denote the passage of time, artworks create a sense of shared place and historical significance that honors the heritage of the local, the immigrant and the tourist alike.

In the artist’s own words, “I sought an image palette from the ancient myths and legends of Europe, Mexico, Japan, India, Latin America, Iran, Russia, Native America, Polynesia and Africa. These images became a visual symphony, a magical dreamscape.”

The pastel drawings were translated into glass mosaics from vivid cake glass, handmade by the artwork fabricator. The 24 glass mosaic panels will be placed in steel frames and installed at the Downtown Santa Monica Station in highly visible places for riders and the public.

Hernandez is thoroughly involved in the process to ensure that the glass mosaic is an accurate translation of her original artwork.

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Metro Presents: Neptune Winds in Union Station Waiting Room this Friday

Photo courtesy of Neptune Winds.

Photo courtesy of Neptune Winds.

Start your weekend with some classical, contemporary and popular music in the Union Station Waiting Room. Neptune Winds of the Colburn Conservatory of Music will be performing on Friday from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. as part of Metro Presents. Drop by and enjoy the tunes!

Transportation headlines, Tuesday, Oct. 21: to park or not to park at Metro stations?

Have a transportation-related article you think should be included in headlines? Drop me an email! And don’t forget, Metro is on TwitterFacebook and Instagram.  

Lack of parking drives many away from mass transit (L.A. Times) 

Parking at the Expo Line's Culver City Station. Photo by Metro.

Parking at the Expo Line’s Culver City Station. Photo by Metro.

An updated look at a long-debated issue in transit circles: how much, if any, lack of parking at transit stations. Forty of Metro’s 80 stations have parking — and parking at some of the most popular stations is often gobbled up early on weekday mornings (Norwalk, NoHo, Universal City and Culver City are a few examples).

On the other hand, Metro has thousands of free spaces — as well as some paid ones — and I can definitely point to places where parking is relatively easy. This interactive map gives you an idea where the parking is located.

Excerpt from the Times article:

“Today I got lucky,” said Ashley Scott, 30, as she waited for her train to Hollywood on a recent Thursday morning. “I was this close to just getting on the 101.”

Scott’s daily dilemma illustrates an often overlooked but significant choke point in the ambitious growth of L.A.’s light-rail system. Metro’s six-line network, which has seen steady ridership gains over the last five years, now carries about 350,000 people on work days. Parking shortages could complicate Metro’s goal of shifting hundreds of thousands more drivers to public transit in coming decades.

Planners say it’s impractical, perhaps impossible, to build enough free parking. Train station lots have low turnover because most commuters leave their cars all day. To meet demand, Metro lots would have to sprawl far beyond the station—or, in dense urban areas, rise several stories.

It’s a tough issue as many planners believe that it’s far wiser in the long-term to build developments with more jobs and/or residences near transit. Their belief is that promoting density near transit will ultimately produce more riders than sprawling parking lots and also lead to building cities with a higher quality-of-life.

On the other hand, it’s undeniable that — at least for now — parking is the carrot that makes taking transit possible for some of our riders.

And then there’s the issue of expense and space. For example, there is no parking planned along the Purple Line Extension subway, which largely follows densely developed Wilshire Boulevard. On the other hand, the Gold Line Foothill Extension — in the more suburban San Gabriel Valley — will eventually have parking at each of its six new stations.

As it happens, I just got off the phone with Andrew Young, who recently co-authored a study with David Levinson at the University of Minnesota that ranked Metro areas according to their transit accessibility to jobs. The Los Angeles area ranked third, so I asked Andrew what he thought about the parking conundrum.

“You can build parking lots that makes transit useful to those who live some distance away from stations or you can build housing and destination adjacent to that station that will be used by those in future who will work and live there,” he said. “The question is: do you want to build for an existing constituency or do you want to build for a currently nonexistent constituency that one day will live next to the station. In many places, building for the future is hard for current politicians….people like the status quo and people in the status quo are the ones who vote and it’s always hard to change that.”

Well said.

Of course, there’s a related issue here, too — whether parking, where it exists, should be free? Streetsblog L.A. has written about that, criticizing Metro for offering free subsidies for auto users that it doesn’t necessarily offer for those who get to stations on foot, bikes or even transit.

Personal disclosure on this item: I often pay $2 to park at the Gold Line’s Del Mar station, where there is always plenty of parking to be had. I could ride my bike, walk or try to snare a ride from the Domestic Partner (when not working herself), but I’ve found driving to be quicker.

More headline funtivitity after the jump! 

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Go Metro to LA Dance Project and you could save on meals in DTLA’s Historic Core

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L.A. Dance Project returns to its home of choice, The Theatre at Ace Hotel in downtown Los Angeles, for three performances this fall. The program features a new work by Benjamin Millepied with music by Phillip Glass, and there are shows on Friday, Oct. 24, Saturday, Oct. 25 and Sunday, Oct. 26.

Plan a night on the town by combining dinner with a show. You’ll be able to save on meals with your TAP card at the following venues near the theatre:

  • Umami Burger – Receive free Thin Fries or Sweet Potato Fries with purchase of a burger
  • Terroni – Save 10% on your bill
  • Peking Tavern – Save 15% on your bill

To get to Ace Hotel, take Metro Bus 30/33035/38 or 40 to Broadway/Olympic. You can also take the Metro Red or Purple Line to Pershing Square Station, then walk four short blocks south on Broadway.

Go Metro to Rock ‘n’ Roll Los Angeles Halloween Half Marathon & 5k

Rock out at the world’s largest Halloween Half Marathon and 5K!

Want to get a head start on your Halloween festivities? Wear your favorite costume this Sunday, October 26 and run in the Rock ‘n’ Roll Los Angeles Half Marathon and 5k. Those with valid TAP cards can save $10 on registration when using promo code LAMETRO14 online.

Participants will run a loop cruise at 7:30 a.m. starting and ending at L.A. LIVE in Downtown L.A. Live bands and cheer teams will be encouraging runners at every mile! Bring your friends and celebrate your accomplishments at the free finish line concert and festival. To get to L.A. LIVE, take the Metro Expo or Blue Line to Pico Station and walk toward Figueroa Street.

For the costume contest, staff members will select finalists in the categories best overall, best rock star, best superhero, scariest and most original costume. Winners will be announced at the end for a chance to win awesome prizes!

Go Metro to Lit Crawl LA: NoHo this Wednesday night

Photos from last year's LA Lit Crawl: NoHo by Rosalind Helfand.

Photos from last year’s Lit Crawl LA: NoHo by Rosalind Helfand.

The second-ever Lit Crawl LA: NoHo returns this Wednesday evening, Oct. 22, from 7 p.m. to midnight–and getting there via Metro is as easy as A-B-C!

Over 170 writers, literary organizations, and series will offer free readings and cultural events at 30 venues along Lankershim and Magnolia Boulevards. Each Lit Crawl location is within walking distance of the other, and of course, the entire NoHo Arts District is reachable by Metro Red Line, Orange Line, or bus. Simply hop on the Red or Orange Line to North Hollywood Station, or bus lines 152/353, 156/656, or 183 to Lankershim/Chandler.

Lit Crawl LA is organized into three 45-minute phases. At each phase, visitors chose from a diverse program of 10 to 12 events. The night ends with a “speakeasy” party at the Federal Bar at 10 p.m. All events are free to attend, however, food and drink are not included. That’s where Metro can help again: present your valid TAP card at the Federal Bar or Bow and Truss restaurant and save 10% and 15% on food, respectively. Just keep in mind that Metro Rail and Orange Line close around midnight Sunday through Thursday.