4 replies

  1. As long as the government is going to mandate people wear masks boarding public transportation; it will be a hard sell to get people to return to buses and trains. Frankly, speaking for myself; I used to take a bus or a train and go to Downtown LA to see things; not anymore with the mask requirement and the spacing out of passengers.

    The people who are going to be the hardest hit by tolls or congestion pricing are the lower income people, who are not near a bus or a train line and are forced to drive. The current system, we have does not encourage people to pay toll. Look at the express toll/transit way on the 110 Harbor Freeway; it was never completed in to Downtown Los Angeles. Buses especially municipal bus lines do not run frequently enough, or even encourage people to use their local transit system. It is especially difficult with commuting to a job when people are being forced out of LA due to the high cost of living; they are forced to drive in order to keep their jobs. The only people that will benefit are wealthy people that do not care how much tolls they spend to get some where.

    In addition, I want to add that your Metro Board of Directors, your CEO, and the majority of your employees can ride the system for free or a discount. The majority of your own employees drive, and do not use the system they work for. The first thing is that your own Metro employees need to start setting a good example for the public; which apparently is not happening. Just your employees that work in your Gateway headquarters building would be a good start.

  2. Usage tolls are regressive taxes on the poor. You will be gifting richer Angelenos a faster commute if this is your fix.

  3. Strong yes to congestion pricing. It should be implemented aggressively. Driving needs to have a cost proportional to its destructive effects. For too long, low income communities with high transit ridership have had to subsidize driving while suffering the worst from air pollution and neighborhood destruction.