Cesar Chavez Transit Pavilion next to Union Station is now open

The Cesar Chavez Transit Pavilion on the southeast corner of Cesar E. Chavez Avenue and Vignes Street opened to the public this morning. The pavilion is just across the street from Union Station’s East Portal and is a major improvement over the previous bus stop that was basically a collection of signs and sidewalk.

The new transit pavilion improves the customer experience and the safety of bus riders with bus shelters, a Metro Bike station and sustainability features. It is a popular stop for riders on several Metro bus lines, including Lines 68, 70, 71, 78, 79, 378 and 770. The corner is the second most active bus stop in the Union Station campus, seeing a combined total of 6,000 daily boardings.

The $3.995-million project was funded in part by an FTA Ladders of Opportunity Grant. Metro funding included sustainability elements such as solar panels built into shade structures along with the integration of native, drought-tolerant landscaping and storm water capture system. Construction on the project started in December 2019 — below is a video made during construction.

Another major bus improvement will be arriving soon: a new platform for the J Line (Silver) and other bus routes that is safer and closer to Union Station.

4 replies

  1. When will the new sliver line platform open? The station is now completed and I don’t see any crews working on the site, why do you keep holding from opening to public?

    • Hi,

      We expect the new J Line (Silver) bus station to open soon. There are some final inspections that must take place before we can open to the public. Thank you.

      Anna Chen
      Writer, The Source

  2. The previous location of the stop across the street, at the base of the Union Station steps was clearly better. It allowed for easier transfers as passengers did not have to run across a street to catch a bus. As for the amenities, I was hoping for something better, but instead, it looks like the tiny, tall canopies provide no shelter from wind or rain. This design reminds me of the time when about 20 passengers were waiting at this stop from 1am-2:30am (the 1:20am bus failed to show up), while it was drizzling and cold, because Union Station kicks passengers out at night. The canopies appear way too small and too tall to be able to keep us dry. At least across the street at the old location, standing against the wall of the headquarters building blocked the wind. It’s extra sad knowing that it cost $4 million to make our lives more miserable. The El Monte Station has similar canopies on the second level, but at least they’re bigger.