UPDATING: Metro COVID-19 news and service information, April 1

This page is being updated as Metro responds to the ongoing health crisis.
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Metro COVID-19 FAQ

UPDATE, April 1, 2020:

  • April Regional Service Council meetings have been cancelled. We plan to resume them in May.
  • NextGen Bus Plan public hearings postponed until July at the earliest. Explore the Plan by visiting the NextGen Virtual Workshop. We welcome your comments via email to nextgen@metro.net.
  • Metro’s law enforcement partners, the nonprofit PATH (People Assisting the Homeless) and Metro’s private security personnel will be conducting assessments of riders at some of our busier transit hubs. The purpose of the assessments is to educate all riders on the importance of limiting travel to essential activities and to try to connect vulnerable and unhoused individuals to shelter beds. No one will be asked any travel details or be required to leave the system.

UPDATE, March 31, 2020:

SERVICE ADJUSTMENTS

METRO BUS

  • Metro Bus service levels will be reduced 15 to 20 percent and we will try to strategically adjust select trips across the system to minimize inconvenience to riders and continue to provide good service on our busiest lines that riders depend on.
  • To assist with social distancing, all Metro Bus riders must board and exit through rear doors only. The front door will remain available to wheelchair riders and those who need the wheelchair ramp. Metro is also requiring all bus operators to use the transparent protective barrier that helps isolate them. While you are not expected to use the fare box or TAP validator at the front of the bus, please be in possession of fare during travel.
    • If you are using the bike rack, please let the bus operator know before exiting the bus — to give you time to get your bike off the rack at the front of the bus.

METRO RAIL

  • Final trips each day departing terminal stations will be at midnight on all trains. Metro Rail will run scheduled weekend service on Saturday and Sunday, with a weekday hybrid schedule on weekdays (see next item).
  • Trains on the B (Red), D (Purple), A (Blue), E (Expo) and L (Gold) Lines will run every 12 minutes between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. with 20 minute service at all other times. D (Purple) Line trains will have four cars and B (Red) Line trains will have six cars in order for riders to maintain proper social distancing of six feet.
  • The C Line (Green) will run every 12 minutes between 4 a.m. and 9 a.m., every 15 minutes until 3 p.m., every 12 minutes from 3 p.m. until 6 p.m. and then every 20 minutes between 6 p.m. until midnight.
  • In order to make final train connections of the night, we recommend making sure you are on the rail system no later than 10:30 p.m. If you require late night service, please consider the Owl Bus Network.

SAFETY MEASURES

  • Metro will begin installing sanitation stations and hand sanitizer dispensers at major transit stops and stations to allow riders to wash their hands, one of the best safeguards against the COVID-19 virus. Metro is also researching how to equip buses and trains with hand sanitizer dispensers to help control the virus.
  • For additional information, please refer to our FAQ.
  • The agency has strengthened cleaning at Union Station and major transit hubs. This includes an elevated focus on cleaning high touch point areas such as handrails, elevator call buttons, and ticket vending machines. Metro also continues to clean buses and trains at least once daily with EPA-approved disinfectants. We’re reviewing cleaning protocols to ensure they are up-to-date as the current situation evolves. In addition, Metro is producing signage and written materials on what customers can do to reduce the risk of being exposed to the virus.

Best practices include:

  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and warm water. Hand washing tips from the CDC are here.
  • Stay home if you are able to do so. 
  • Cough or sneeze into your elbow or use a tissue.
  • Make sure you are using a robust, regular cleaning schedule for frequently touched surfaces such as cell phones and computers.

UPDATE, March 30, 2020:

  • To allow for greater social distancing in the workplace, Metro will be implementing the following adjustments to our customer support departments beginning Monday, March 30, 2020 until further notice.
    • All processing of paper reduced fare applications are suspended until further notice.
    • On-line reduced fare applications processing will continue.
    • Union Station East Portal and Wilshire/Vermont Customer Centers will remain open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to  2 p.m.
    • Baldwin Hills and East Los Angeles Center Customer Centers will remain open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
    • Metro Lost and Found office will be closed. Lost items will be held until further notice.
    • Please use our online form to submit a claim.
  • We are running as many buses as we can with available staff and we’re continuing to monitor and adjust service to meet demand and ensure essential workers can travel while maintaining a safe social distance. Because these adjustments are happening in real-time, our arrival data on NexTrip may not be accurate.
  • Angel’s Flight closed beginning Saturday, March 28, 2020 until further notice.
  • Metro will be joining the city of Los Angeles Department of Transportation in providing bus transportation to those who may need alternative aid, such as social service assessment, shelter or mental health services. If you encounter individuals in need, please call 888.950.7233 or alert Metro staff so we can help connect unhoused riders with essential programs and services in the region.

TAP Customer Service

Metro Customer Centers

  • All Metro Customer Centers will remain open but with limited hours.
    • Union Station East Portal and Wilshire/Vermont will remain open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to  2 p.m.
    • Baldwin Hills and East Los Angeles Center will remain open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Metro Lost and Found

  • Office will be closed. Lost items will be held until further notice.
  • Customer bike picks-ups are suspended.
  • Please use our online form to submit a claim.

UPDATE, March 26, 2020:

  • Metro has made emergency adjustments to Via to ensure there are transportation options for people who need them most during this difficult time. Via will now provide point-to-point trips within service zones. This will allow anyone traveling within the El Monte, North Hollywood and Compton zones to reach essential destinations. Via is discontinuing shared rides and shifting to private rides in support of social distancing. Riders can bring along one additional rider. Drivers will continue to carefully wipe down all vehicle surfaces before driving and as often as possible during their shifts, with special attention to surfaces that passengers frequently come in contact with.
  • For those staying at home: here’s a TAP Coloring Book you can download.
  • We are running as many buses as we can with available staff and we’re continuing to monitor and adjust service to meet demand and ensure essential workers can travel while maintaining a safe social distance. Because these adjustments are happening in real-time, our arrival data on NexTrip may not be accurate.

UPDATE, March 24, 2020:

  • A maintenance worker at Metro’s Division 5 bus yard in South Los Angeles has tested positive for the COVID-19 virus.

    The employee was last at work on Monday, March 16, and Metro received confirmation of a positive COVID-19 test on Monday, March 23. The worker had been hospitalized but was released to go home and recover under quarantine.

    Co-workers at Division 5 who may have been in contact with the employee within the past 14 days have been notified by Metro. Per U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention protocols, they have been asked to self-monitor their health, including taking their temperatures twice each day and seeking health care if they develop a fever or other symptoms of the virus.

    Metro thoroughly cleaned and disinfected the areas of Division 5 where the employee worked on Tuesday morning.

OTHER

  • Metro will be keeping an eye on ridership in the days ahead and may make other quick-strike adjustments to reflect current demand and deploy service to areas most in need. This means NexTrip and other trip planning apps may not have accurate arrival times. If you need assistance locating your bus, call 323.GOMETRO or message us on Twitter @metrolaalerts.
  • Metrolink adjusts schedules effective Thursday, March 26 until further notice. Metrolink ridership is down around 80% systemwide, which means a temporary reduction of service levels can occur without the danger of creating crowding situations on trains.

UPDATE, March 23, 2020:

  • Two contractors working on Metro construction projects have been confirmed as having the COVID-19 virus. Neither had any involvement with the day-to-day operations of the Metro bus and rail system. The first case involves a field electrical subcontractor working on the Portal Widening & Turnback Facility project at the Red/Purple Line subway yards in downtown Los Angeles. The second case involves a document worker for Walsh Shea Corridor Constructors, the firm building the Crenshaw/LAX Line light rail project. Staff that were in contact with the contractors have been asked to self-quarantine and remain from their work sites. More info here.
  • Metro continues to do its best to protect riders and agency employees from COVID-19. Cleaning of buses, trains and facilities has been strengthened. Gloves are available to bus operators who are also required to use the protective barriers between the driver’s seat and the remainder of the bus. Metro also began rear-door only boarding and exiting on its bus system.

UPDATE, March 22, 2020:

  • To assist with social distancing, all Metro Bus riders must board and exit through rear doors only. The front door will remain available to wheelchair riders and those who need the wheelchair ramp. Metro is also requiring all bus operators to use the transparent protective barrier that helps isolate them. While you are not expected to use the fare box or TAP validator at the front of the bus, please have a loaded TAP card with you during travel.
    • If you are using the bike rack, please let the bus operator know before exiting the bus — to give you time to get your bike off the rack at the front of the bus.
  • We ask that all riders do their best to practice social distancing once aboard the bus — that is, spread out and try to stay at least six feet from other riders. With many people staying home from work, there is much more room on our buses for social distancing.

UPDATE, March 20, 2020:

  • Metro would like to extend a huge thank you to our front line staff who have selflessly kept our buses and trains rolling this week, and to all riders using Metro. While we will continue to operate service for those who rely on public transportation to access health care, food, and other essential resources, we would like to emphasize that if you are able to stay home, please do so and help us flatten the curve.
  • Metro press briefing with CEO Phil Washington and other senior staff, click link to view.
  • Please follow the state stay-at-home orders issued on March 19 by Gov. Gavin Newsom — Metro will remain in service for essential travel.
  • Metro Bus service levels will be reduced 15 to 20 percent and we will try to strategically adjust select trips across the system to minimize inconvenience to riders and continue to provide good service on our busiest lines that riders depend on.
  • Rail service will be adjusted as follows:
    • Starting tonight, March 20, and until further notice, last trips departing terminal stations will be at midnight on all trains. Metro Rail will run scheduled weekend service on Saturday and Sunday, with a weekday hybrid schedule on weekdays (see next item).
    • Starting Monday, March 23, trains on the B (Red), D (Purple), A (Blue), E (Expo) and L (Gold) Lines will run every 12 minutes between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. with 20 minute service at all other times. D (Purple) Line trains will have four cars and B (Red) Line trains will have six cars in order for riders to maintain proper social distancing of six feet.
    • Starting Monday, March 23, the C Line (Green) will run every 12 minutes between 4 a.m. and 9 a.m., every 15 minutes until 3 p.m., every 12 minutes from 3 p.m. until 6 p.m. and then every 20 minutes between 6 p.m. until midnight.
    • In order to make final train connections of the night, we recommend making sure you are on the rail system no later than 10:30 p.m. If you require late night service, please consider the Owl Bus Network.
  • Metro will be keeping an eye on ridership in the days ahead and may make other quick-strike adjustments to reflect current demand and deploy service to areas most in need. This means NexTrip and other trip planning apps may not have accurate arrival times. If you need assistance locating your bus, call 323.GOMETRO or message us on Twitter @metrolaalerts.
  • Metro will begin installing sanitation stations and hand sanitizer dispensers at major transit stops and stations to allow riders to wash their hands, one of the best safeguards against the COVID-19 virus. Metro is also researching how to equip buses and trains with hand sanitizer dispensers to help control the virus.
  • For additional information, please refer to our FAQ.

UPDATE: March 17, 2020

The agency has strengthened cleaning at Union Station and major transit hubs. This includes an elevated focus on cleaning high touch point areas such as handrails, elevator call buttons, and ticket vending machines. Metro also continues to clean buses and trains at least once daily with EPA-approved disinfectants. We’re reviewing cleaning protocols to ensure they are up-to-date as the current situation evolves. In addition, Metro is producing signage and written materials on what customers can do to reduce the risk of being exposed to the virus.

Best practices include:

  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and warm water. Hand washing tips from the CDC are here.
  • Stay home if you are able to do so. 
  • Cough or sneeze into your elbow or use a tissue.
  • Make sure you are using a robust, regular cleaning schedule for frequently touched surfaces such as cell phones and computers.

UPDATE, March 13, 2020:

  • Amtrak reports passenger that traveled through Union Station may have tested positive for COVID-19.

UPDATE, March 12, 2020:

UPDATED: March 3, 2020

As many people are already aware, an outbreak of COVID-19, also known as coronavirus, has disrupted daily life in many places across the globe. The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health has declared a local and public health emergency in response to increased spread of coronavirus across the country and six additional cases in L.A. County.

From their press release:

Public Health stated that none of the new cases are from community spread, and all of these new cases were exposed to COVID-19 through close contacts. None of these cases were linked to the first case reported in LA County in January.

Metro is being proactive and has formed a Contagious Virus Response Task Force that is closely coordinating with the L.A. County Department of Public Health and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to ensure an appropriate response to the coronavirus. There is no indication at this time that there is any increased risk to people riding our buses, trains and bikes.

The agency has strengthened cleaning at Union Station and major transit hubs. This includes an elevated focus on cleaning high touch point areas such as handrails, elevator call buttons, and ticket vending machines. Metro also continues to clean buses and trains at least once daily with EPA-approved disinfectants. We’re reviewing cleaning protocols to ensure they are up-to-date as the current situation evolves. In addition, Metro is producing signage and written materials on what customers can do to reduce the risk of being exposed to the virus.

We can’t stress enough that we need the public’s help to keep our system clean and safe.

L.A. County residents, students, workers and visitors are encouraged to practice good public health hygiene, as this is also the height of flu season. Best practices include:

  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and warm water. Hand washing tips from the CDC are here.
  • Stay home if you’re sick.
  • Cough or sneeze into your elbow or use a tissue.
  • Make sure you are using a robust, regular cleaning schedule for frequently touched surfaces such as cell phones and computers.

Check publichealth.lacounty.gov for updates or more information. This article at Vice also explains why you shouldn’t fear going out in public or using transit.

Metro takes our role in supporting regional mobility and operating services seriously. We have previously dealt with similar public health situations before, including influenza, SARS and H1N1, and will draw on past experiences to inform our response going forward. Metro will continue to ensure that our system remains as safe and clean as possible.  

 

49 replies

  1. It does not help when Metro has homeless people constantly on the trains and refusing to move. They are unclean and urinate and defecate on the trains. You could start by somehow removing such people that carry germs and smell up the train cars.

    • I totally agree with Rick Beaver…..the homeless situation on the trains is horrible. I do not feel safe. Either they are mentally abusive or they smell so bad I have to try several cars before I find one I can breath in. The police do not ride the trains and police the aisles….they just take the train to get to the next platform where they just stand for awhile till they go to the next platform. Also I no longer see undercover police on the trains. They have gone from bad to worse, especially the Blue Line. Now with the Coronavirus threat I will definately have to go back to driving.

    • Well, that’s a completely unrelated topic since the ‘germs’ you say they are carrying are not COVID-19, but thanks for showing your true colors and lack of empathy for the underprivileged and mentally ill on this online forum.

      • Everyone deserves to be treated with decency and respect. If you are a frequent rider, you know that Metro is extremely negligent in how it handles issues that occur within the train. The problems on the Metro continue to worsen on a daily basis. I don’t have problems with homeless people using the train, but I do have problems with people smoking weed, using drugs, and creating filth on the train. It endangers the health of everyone on the train.

      • Use your brain, seriously. Ignorance like yours is what fuels a pandemic. It is DIRECTLY related. Lack of hygiene, cleanliness and basic handwashing is what spreads COVID-19.

    • I agree with all here. The trains are disgusting due to homeless people using as a hotel. I think Metro police should ask for cards to see if people have paid to ride. I catch the gold line in Little Tokyo and count the amount of people that tap vs. the ones that don’t (for one person that taps, at least 25 don’t). I blame it on Metro for not installing turnstiles at all stations. I know that the thugs will still get in without paying but at least the turnstile will be somewhat of a deterrent for some.

    • Metro thinks they are being compassionate by not doing anything, but they are actually enabling the situation, and yet, the honest people are being ticketed while the homeless don’t have to pay, I passed out Winter Shelter Info this winter on the trains and I didn’t
      t see any of these homeless advocates out there, I was totally alone in the effort, and was not getting paid, nevertheless, many of the homeless didn’t want the information, some don’t want help, when some really did, and was thankful…

  2. We feel unsafe seating on dirty seats (they should be replaced and fabric should be completely removed as it absorbs dirt and smells bad and then we seat on that). Yes, there are so many homeless sneaking on the trains. There should be cameras everywhere and EVERYTHING should get cleaned and sanitized to prevent CoronaVirus spread. Better to prevent now than to deal with the consequences later.

  3. At the very least, we need to resume sweeping trains at the end of the line instead of putting them on for service immediately. Even if it requires another train in service, get everyone off the train at the end of the line so germs can’t fester in one spot.

  4. Unless the way buses were cleaned when I worked at the RTD/MTA has not changed there is little cleaning except the blowing out of debris at the Fuel Station. The wiping down and mopping is only performed on a limited amount of buses during the day by Service Attendants mid day when there are few buses in need of fueling. Although the majority of contamination is the result of homeless persons riding the bus there are regular passengers as well who do not exercise healthy daily care of themselves.

    Perhaps the MTA should adopt a policy not to heat the buses and trains plus secure all the windows in the open position. This was the policy they used at Fort Ord during the Spinal Meningitis epidemic there in the late 1960’s. We certainly were not comfortable especially at night but the occurrence of the disease was stymied.

    • To repeat: the buses are cleaned before they go into service. It’s simply not practical to wipe a bus down every time someone gets on or off. Even if we wiped down the buses several times a day, we would still tell riders the same thing the health department is telling us: the best and most effective way to prevent corona from spreading is to have people wash their hands frequently and to avoid touching their face (especially mouth, nose and eyes).

      And this: I reject the notion that everything was always done better in the past. Sure, sometimes. Always? Nope.

      Steve Hymon
      Editor, The Source

      • I never said it was done better in the past. What I reported was how it was done in the past and believe nothing has changed. You’re getting a little defensive unnecessarily.

  5. Let me tell you a story (Finish your meal before proceeding): I once hopped on a 704 Rapid bus heading EB starting at 4th/Santa Monica, it was 60ft NABI articulated bus, and proceeded to seat on the last forward facing seat on the bus (right under rear headsign). Once the bus got closer t the 405, I noticed there was more people aboard, notice the left most rear seat of the bus was open so I proceed to walk towards the seat only to find. . . DRY VOMIT all over that seat and Window.

    That was just. . . bad, I immediately got off the bus and got on the next one.

    What angered me the most from that experience was the fact that it was dry vomit, not wet, dry. That means that the bus must’ve done at least 2 runs with that vomit just laying there.

    You guys have up to this point refused to take the proper actions because “the virus isn’t in LA county,” which is by far just a pathetic exc. . . *sigh*

    Just please answer me this Metro: If you guys allow a bus that’s been exposed to Vomit continue making runs, why should we really trust you guys?? Honest question.

    • Hi Jose,

      First, very sorry about that experience. Not what anyone wants, obviously.

      Second, do you know if anyone reported it to the bus operator? That is the kind of situation in which we would get the bus clean as soon as possible.

      Thanks,

      Steve Hymon
      Editor, The Source

      • That was pretty much my thought. This bus should’ve been taken out of service even well before I became aware of it. It could’ve been someone with the Norovirus at worst.

        Steve,

        This was anywhere between 12-18 months ago, I recall reporting it but I couldn’t remember the last 2 digits of the the bus. I just remembered it was between the 9270s-9290s, that I do recall. And it was probably around 7:30pm when I first caught the bus.

        • There’s this thing called a wetvac.

          It can clean up messes such as vomit in less than three minutes.

          It costs considerably less than taking a bus out of service, which would also affect commuters trying to get home or to work.

          Perhaps the best way to handle such issues is to notify the operator.

          • Umm, that’s the thing: That shouldn’t be the case at all. Like I said it was dry, which meant it had been there for hours and the operator should’ve already had known had they actually done a walk down on the bus.

            Also, truth be told, many operators just don’t care, and that’s a fact. They see dry puke and their first thought is most likely going to be “they don’t pay me enough to clean that,” so at that point taking the bus out of service and affecting commuters for the sake of safety would’ve been the right thing to do.

  6. As one who goes through Crenshaw Station on the C (Green) line nearly every weekday, there’s no way those elevators are cleaned every day: the dirt is the same shape it’s been for months. I get that folks use it as a loo many times a day (thus the near constant aroma of urine, etc). This does not explain the fossilized filth.

  7. I have ridden the full length of the Blue Line with pools of vomit, fecal matter and urine in the train…at 5:45am in the morning before full rush hour even started! Not to mention urine and fecal matter spotted on the platforms as well. I have seen men urinating in the corners of the train and directly on the cloth seats. The last time I saw a Metro staff member “cleaning the train,” they were walking through with a squirt bottle and randomly spraying it here and there. No consistency, no thorough scrubbing or wiping. I do not feel assured one bit from this statement and dramatized ad from Metro.

  8. I’m sorry, but I think I’ll be going back to driving and Uber/Lyft on work days, and I’ll stick to Big Blue Bus on days I have class. Unlike the Red/Expo Line, the buses on BBB are actually clean. No homeless, no dirty seats and poles, and no inconsiderate drivers. It’s a shame the Rapid 7 doesn’t run late anymore but as per usual, Metro’s incompetence has lead to this. I’ll change my school and work schedule appropriately, which I’m glad I have the privilege to do as such.

    Go ahead, continue to ignore the homeless and bodily fluid complaints, but they won’t go away without addressing the situation.

    • Metro it’s true changes need to be made the big blue buses are cleaned entirely everyday and mopped why is it so hard to do would you check into a hotel that’s cleaned every 3 months like your buses are scheduled for scrubs

  9. There needs to be proper fare enforcement, most of the people causing problems are probably the one’s who are riding for free. I haven’t had my tap card checked on 18 months. The early train from Santa Monica, 6.00 am has mainly homeless people on it who use it as a hotel. Last week a homeless person on the Expo train from downtown LA was coughing for the entire journey without covering his mouth. I’ll probably start driving to work soon as the corona virus situation will get worse. You need to check who is actually riding these trains, plus the amount of money being lost must be astronomical.

    • Completely agree with this. Proper and strict fare enforcement should help reduce the number of troublemakers (likely riding for free) whose presence annoy and/or threaten the safety of other law-abiding riders, and otherwise take up space that should be reserved for paying customers. Also would like to see regular sweeps at the end of the line to remove/discourage those who are using the trains as mobile shelters.

      • Here’s what I didn’t like about the constant fare enforcement:

        Several times, it holds up passengers trying to make a timely connection to get to work.

        Secondly, the aggressive fare enforcement was enacted primarily on days/nights of inclement weather– rain, low-to-freezing temperatures, etc.

        I’m pretty convinced that if homeless people had someplace else to go, they would. And since we obviously don’t want them on the buses, what solutions are we ready to propose?

  10. I can’t even see you guys f$&@ seriously?
    I’m a new Yorker living here now 8 years and although I have a lot to say I’m shocked that you ONLY CLEAN THE BUSES ONCE A DAY however you are saying you need the public help and instructing us to HAVE A ROBUST CLEANING CLEANING SCHEDULE FOR FREQUENTLY TOUCHED SURFACES BUT METRO ONLY CLEANS ONCE A DAY?

    I have been assaulted on the bus, I’ve seen sexual advances, waste and human soil on my regular 720 line the SAME CRAP STAINS Soil that bus for weeks THIS IS A SHAM I GUESS NEXT YOU WANT THE PAYING LAWFUL RIDERS TO START CLEANING AND DISINFECTING THE TRAIN 🙄 you allow people to get on with up to 6 bags of waste and trash and recycling etc what you should offer is a program where homeless people can help clean the trains build showers for them mental heath services at your employees facilities etc because you do not in enforce ridership rules on this Vulnerable Population however it’s still not fair to the rest of us I digress because this is not about homelessness it’s ABOUT YOUR TIPID RESPONSE TO CORNAVIRUS and ARROGANCE TO SUGGEST THE PUBLIC HAVE A ROBUST CLEANING SCHEDULE BUT METRO WITH 200,000 PEOPLE A DAY TOUCHING SERVICES ONLY CLEANS ONE AGAIN 🤦‍♀️ 🤦🏽‍♂️ 🤦🏼‍♂️🤦🏿‍♀️ IM RIDING THE BUS/SUBWAY TODAY Let’s see how long this ONCE A DAY cleaning is working out will take 📸 #LAMETRONEEDSTOSMELLTHEBUS

  11. I do see this at 7th/Metro and Santa Monica during the day. At night that’s a different story though. Catching the train after 10pm at Union Station is essentially a rolling tent and no one in sight to remove everyone sleeping off the train. You can’t exactly expect an increasing in night time ridership to boost with A) trains every 20 min with mismatched transfers, B) decrease in capacity 3 to 2 car trains and packing everyone in a train, especially during a pandemic (really?) and C) just outright poor hygiene at night.

    This is why I’m avoiding Metro by all means and sticking to BBB and Uber/Lyft for now. At least my Lyft rides smell like Lysol every time I ride on one.

  12. With the Coronavirus spreading so rapidly and now a death in Los Angeles County it’s time the MTA and the other carriers become pro-active and address the crisis forcefully. Every bus terminal (end of the line) should be manned by one or more Service Attendants that will clean every bus or train prior to its departure on its next trip. If only one line is at a terminal, those buses should be detoured to the nearest multi line terminal for cleaning and its schedule adjusted. It’s very apparent this virus will not go away in a short time. Others are being pro-active, our countries public transit must respond appropriately.

    In addition to the cleaning, every bus operator should be mandated to close their security panel separating them from the passengers. Where panels have not been installed as of yet a stepped up retro fit on the week-ends should be initiated.

  13. There is no open window available inside the train and some of the newer buses. Besides the frequent cleaning, the virus would still spread around when air is not circulated. I am not sure how often do Metro clean and change the air filter but most of the time the A/C has some smells, and turning the A/C unit on may not prevent them either. No open window poses a threat to riders when smoke occurs inside the train and bus with windows down. I don’t see how could we feel safe when riding public transportation.

  14. A non-bus related COVID-19 issue: Metro should consider relating the subsidy requirements for vanpools during this public health emergency, as ridership (both number of riders, and number of days a van operates) will be down due to remote work requirements and self-isolation. Subsidies can be the difference in a vanpool surviving financially or not.

  15. there is sometimes no need to homeless to ride to bus just to move to a different part of the city, if they are clean that’s ok but some smell really bad and left the bus with the small for quite some time. They are also very dirty

  16. Metro MTA needs to “Close Their Doors” on all Buses & Rail Trains to the public until the COVID-19 Virus Disease Passes to protect the Public, Bus & Rail Operaters !!!

    • Hi,

      Many people — including health care workers and first responders — rely on public transportation to access jobs, food, care and other essential resources. We will remain in service until told otherwise by public health officials. Please read the remainder of the post to see the measures we are taking to keep our system clean and safe. Thank you.

      Anna Chen
      Writer, The Source

    • I agree 💯. But since we know they won’t do that, metro MTA should at the least provide gloves and mask for their operators. In particular, the bus operators who are so expose to the public.

  17. I ride the A (Blue) Line from start to finish each workday and I can tell you the MTA doesn’t care about our health or safety. When I get on the train on 1st street, I am routinely the only person who swipes his card because most of the other riders are the homeless! I don’t know why there are no officers checking riders? The homeless are not clean, let’s just be honest and you can best bet many of them have Coronavirus and spreading it via public transportation. But the MTA doesn’t care because I bet most of the big wigs don’t take public transportation themselves so who cares right?

    • This is true. Metro don’t care and will never do anything about that homeless situation on public transportation. So long as the government keeps giving them that check ANYONE, and I do mean ANYONE! can ride their trains or buses. They give their bus operators a hard time! The bus operators are dehumanized. Not one word out to their operators per division about this coronavirus. My friend told me that yesterday was the first time he/she got info as to where to check online about metro’s intentions. They never made an announcement or anything to their bus operators. They have them out there with no gloves and no mask.They don’t care about the public or their operators. They treat there operators like crap. Which is crazy since the operators are the back bone of the company.

    • Unfortunately, metro does Not care! The big wigs do not ride the system ,metro provides personal vehicles for them to drive around. The mayor of LA holds three seats at the a metro board of directors and could do more if he wanted to

      • Hi So sad;

        Executive staff are not given personal vehicles by Metro. We do have fleet cars that staff can use for the kind of work trips that are difficult via transit but staff who commute via car almost always use their own cars.

        Steve Hymon
        Editor, The Source

  18. Yes, there is a lot we don’t know about the coronavirus. If you look back and learn from the lessons of history, the world has encountered disease outbreaks with the likes of cholera, measles, bubonic plague, leprosy, polio, HIV/AIDS, MERS, SARS, avian flu, and much more. There were periods where we did not know as much about them as we do today. Not to mention, the world has faced other trials and tribulations before. Some include: The Great Depression, the stock market crash of 1929, two world wars, and September 11. We must never give in to xenophobia and ignorance. Else, that brews blame, bigotry, and hate. We, as human beings, are much better than that. Be informed. Help out your fellow brothers and sisters in times of need. A shimmering light will appear in our darkest hour. Like the mythical phoenix that rises out of the ashes, we, too, will rise and overcome this crisis. Place your trust in God alone. He is sovereign.

  19. Unfortunately I do not believe MTA and what they say. I have ridden the Blue Line for 10 years but just started driving today. I do not feel the train is clean and safe at all! When I first started riding the train the Sheriffs were responsible for policing the line and there were fare checkers and Sheriffs as well at transfer points at Willowbrook and they rode the trains and randomly checked passenger fares. Then the contract was given to LAPD because MTA said the Sheriffs were not doing a good job……All I see now are LAPD on the platforms. The only time they are on the trains is to go to the next platform. They do not check fares. There are no longer fare checkers as well. It has been two years since my fare has been checked. Like Mark says I am one of the few who taps my card…Most just blow by because no one is checking. I am done……… I have written to MTA and do not get responses or I get the canned responses I see from the Source writers. Good luck MTA with making any money when the people that pay are no longer riding.

  20. My father works for the MTA, he’s 64 years of age and a few years ago had a heart attack. He is a high risk for contracting this virus. I am afraid for his life. He does not have any sick days remaining and he does not want to call out. What can he do? Can he take leave without pay? My whole family is terrified for him. If you could please offer any advice or help, we would greatly appreciate it.

    • Hi Jessica,

      At this time we highly encourage your father to speak to his direct supervisor about these concerns to explore what options are available. Metro has also sent out an employee FAQ, which is posted on the employee intranet and at divisions, which may be able to provide some guidance. We hope this is helpful and hope you and your family stay safe.

      Thank you,

      Anna Chen
      Writer, The Source

  21. Any mass public transportation (buses, trains, etc.) is a germ incubator. There is a push from several groups to try to push Californians out of their cars – more paid car pool lanes, added fees & taxes for driving, an so on. These groups will not tell the public to avoid public transportation because it ruins their narrative and goals. They put that ahead of public safety. Here’s a fact though. If I drive alone in my car somewhere, there is zero chance of me catching COVID-19 from someone else. If I go on public transportation, all bets are off. Be smart, drive alone in your car, and pressure government representatives to issue a “do not use public transportation” warning until this is over.

    • Hi John Doe;

      With all due respect, I don’t think driving means zero chance of contracting COVID-19 or anything else. At some point, you will likely depart your car and there is always the chance of catching something. Even outside the current pandemic, we think the chance of contracting anything can be reduced to reasonable levels by following best practice hygiene levels, including frequent hand washing.

      Steve Hymon
      Editor, The Source

  22. I purchased a 30 day pass last week but my office has been shut down due to the coronavirus indefinitely. Is there any way to get a refund or have there be a hold on the pass until things settle down? I would hate for my $100 to go to waste.

    • Hi Janette,

      At this time we’re asking pass holders to hang on to their passes until their daily commutes are back to normal. Once you start riding again, affected customers can call 866-TAPTOGO and we will add the additional days to their TAP cards. If you had additional questions or concerns please email CustomerService@taptogo.net

      Thanks,

      Anna Chen
      Writer, The Source