Re-envisioning Rosie photo exhibit opens at Union Station

Jobs to Move America will debut the photography exhibit Women Can Build: Re-envisioning Rosie to the public at Los Angeles Union Station on May 22, 2015. Located in Union Station’s waiting room, the exhibit will run through June 19 and will feature 15 photos and stories of modern women who build our 21st century transportation including trams, rail and buses.

Here’s a preview of some of the awesome women featured and their stories:

ami rasmussen

Ami Rasmussen, an interior assembly foreman at the Kinkisharyo railcar factory in Palmdale, CA.

There are pros and cons to working with so many men. You get razzed a little.  It is very intimidating to come in and see a factory full of men.  But my male coworkers here are better than I expected, I got open arms from every one of the guys.  Plus, I was in charge of 78 guys in the military, so I thought, ‘I got this.’ – Ami Rasmussen

Ruby Diaz, a quality control technician at the Kinkisharyo railcar factory in Palmdale, CA.

Ruby Diaz, a quality control technician at the Kinkisharyo railcar assembly facility in Palmdale.

It’s hard for women, they feel they don’t have enough strength, or power, or dedication. It is a tough and heavy job. But women can work just as hard as anybody. Women shouldn’t be intimidated. – Ruby Diaz

Maria Nunes-Rothstein, an assembly technician at the New Flyer Industries bus factory in St. Cloud, MN.

Maria Nunes-Rothstein, an assembly technician at the New Flyer Industries bus factory in St. Cloud, MN.

When I first heard about the job at New Flyer Industries from my husband, I laughed.  I didn’t think I could do the job. But my husband convinced me to apply, and now I do technical assembly. This is an important job because every bus is different and requires different parts. Women workers can do anything they want to. If you think you can’t, you won’t do it. But if you think you can do it, you will. – Maria Nunes-Rothstein

Hilda Solis, United States Secretary of Labor from 2009-2013 and the first female Latina member of the Cabinet.  Currently a member of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors and Metro Board of Directors.

Hilda Solis, United States Secretary of Labor from 2009-2013 and the first female Latina member of the Cabinet. Currently a member of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors and Metro Board of Directors.

Unfortunately, stereotypes still exist in the 21st century workforce. Some jobs are less encouraging and more daunting to women who have much more to prove than their male counterparts. It is incumbent on all of us to encourage young women to re-think about transit manufacturing, and dispel any misrepresentation and stereotypes that are associated with the profession itself and the women who are part of it. – Hilda Solis

Maria Elena Durazo, first female Executive Secretary Treasurer of Los Angeles County Labor Federation.

Maria Elena Durazo, first female Executive Secretary Treasurer of Los Angeles County Labor Federation.

#WomenCanBuild tells the story of the extraordinary women who are already doing these manufacturing jobs and have been for many years. The diversity of their capabilities is very telling.  These women are extremely capable, strong, and beautiful. What an honor to be in the same project alongside these powerful women. – Maria Elena Durazo

The exhibit photos are taken by Pulitzer Prize recipient Deanne Fitzmaurice and will be displayed alongside never-before-exhibited historic photographs of WWII-era “Rosie the Riveter” manufacturing workers, connecting past and present. The “modern Rosies” work for global transit equipment manufacturing companies that have U.S. factories, including Siemens, New Flyer Industries, Nippon Sharyo and Kinkisharyo (who is building Metro’s new light rail vehicles).

The intent of this exhibit is to inspire more young girls to work in heavy manufacturing and deliver the message that women can — and want to — build. It will hopefully also encourage global companies building mass transportation to increase opportunities for women on the factory floor in U.S. manufacturing jobs.

 All photos courtesy of Jobs to Move America

2 replies

  1. “It’s hard for women, they feel they don’t have enough strength, or power, or dedication. It is a tough and heavy job. But women can work just as hard as anybody. Women shouldn’t be intimidated.”

    You say it, sister! We live in changing times. People who assume that women are incapable of doing things that men can should be ashamed of themselves on how backward they are.

    In today’s world, women serve alongside men in battle.
    This is a good documentary “The History of Women in the Military”

    //youtu.be/uHZ9gqdpPxY

    Women are strong and they are also perfectly capable of defending themselves too.