Friday Five: Insta-round up for Oct 25

Welcome to Friday Five, a weekly roundup of five transit pics we’re loving on Instagram. Want to be featured? Tag @MetroLosAngeles on Instagram to get our attention and follow us for more fun transit photos. And without further adieu…

Fun pic from the Pomona Pumpkin Patch Pedal, props to this gentlemen who hauled both pumpkin and kids!

Awesome colors and J.J. Abrams-style flare.

Because I love rainy days in Tokyo, the bicycle-specific crosswalk and clear umbrellas.

Great atmospheric pic of the Hamburg Hauptbahnhof (or if you’re like me and can’t pronounce German, The Hof).

Nice pic showcasing the station art at Gold Line Soto Station.

Transportation headlines, Tuesday, Feb. 26: art of transit, does light rail stop people from driving?, raising the gas tax?

Here is a look at some of the transportation headlines gathered by us and the Metro Library. The full list of headlines is posted on the Library’s Headlines blog, which you can also access via email subscription or RSS feed.

ART OF TRANSIT: A bus on Broadway in downtown Los Angeles. Photo by Steve Hymon/Metro.

ART OF TRANSIT: A bus on Broadway in downtown Los Angeles. There’s a color version after the jump — I like the photo but can’t decide which version I like better. You decide! Photo by Steve Hymon/Metro.

Does light rail really stop people from driving (The Atlantic Cities) 

A new study in the UK showed little evidence that four different light rail lines (all in Britain) made much of any difference on car ownership rates or the amount of driving. Rail ridership in the light rail corridors did go up, but that mostly seemed to come at the expense of bus ridership. Excerpt:

With that in mind, the work still underscores some important lessons. For starters, it offers a sound piece of advice: cities considering a light rail system should strongly consider whether improving the local bus system would be cheaper and just as effective. It also provides yet another reminder of the irrational love people have for their cars; getting city residents to give up driving often requires more than just offering them a ride.

LA Observed: Traffic, bikes and the 405 (KCRW)

LA Observed Kevin Roderick’s weekly radio segment focuses on the lack of talk about traffic during the mayoral campaign. Voters seem interested, Roderick says, but it’s hard for any prospective mayor to credibly say they can fix traffic — thus the talk instead of providing alternatives to it, i.e. bikes and transit. Good segment.

The case for a higher gas tax (New York Times) 

Valerie J. Karplus, a research scientist in the Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change at M.I.T., uses this op-ed piece to make the case that the only thing that will get Americans to drive less is more expensive gasoline. And by expensive she means a lot more than the current national average of $3.72. Excerpts:

But if our goal is to get Americans to drive less and use more fuel-efficient vehicles, and to reduce air pollution and the emission of greenhouse gases, gas prices need to be even higher. The current federal gasoline tax, 18.4 cents a gallon, has been essentially stable since 1993; in inflation-adjusted terms, it’s fallen by 40 percent since then.

Politicians of both parties understandably fear that raising the gas tax would enrage voters. It certainly wouldn’t make lives easier for struggling families. But the gasoline tax is a tool of energy and transportation policy, not social policy, like the minimum wage.

She argues that President Obama took the easier path by greatly raising the fuel efficiency requirements of new vehicles — something that won’t reduce driving much or raise much money for infrastructure improvements. I do think the new standards, however, have a good chance of greatly reducing air pollution in our region. But if driving greatly increases, then those gains could be for naught.

Continue reading

The art of transit

photo by David S. Wilson, via Flickr

Nice shot of the King’s Cross train station in London taken with the Hipstamatic app on an iPhone 4. Speaking of iPhones, I’m still waiting to see some reader submissions of transit pics taken with the snazzy new camera on the iPhone 4s. Come on, folks! I’m stuck with a 3GS, so indulge me.

To submit a photo for the Art of Transit, post it to Metro’s Flickr group, email it to sourcemetro@gmail.com or Tweet it to @metrolosangeles with an #artoftransit hashtag. Many of the photos we’ve featured can be seen in these galleries on Flickr.

The art of transit

photo by Kevin Hair, via submission

Nice shot of the Orange Line taken with an iPhone 4 and the Leme Cam Pro app. I’ve never tried that one, but am adding to the list. Here’s the free version and here’s the Pro version (for 99 cents). It’s always also refreshing to get a nice local submission.

To submit a photo for the Art of Transit, post it to Metro’s Flickr group, email it to sourcemetro@gmail.com or Tweet it to @metrolosangeles with an #artoftransit hashtag. Many of the photos we’ve featured can be seen in these galleries on Flickr.

The art of transit

photo by Zach Ellerbrook, via Flickr

Nice photo taken at the Addison stop on the Chicago El with a Retro Camera Android Hipsteroku. I found the photo in the Chicago Transit Authority Flickr group, which always boasts great photography from Chicago residents. 

To submit a photo for the Art of Transit, post it to Metro’s Flickr group, email it to sourcemetro@gmail.com or Tweet it to @metrolosangeles with an #artoftransit hashtag. Many of the photos we’ve featured can be seen in these galleries on Flickr.

The art of transit

photo by Mike Cattell, via Flickr

A different kind of bus stop in rural Martyr Worthy, England. The dining room chair is a nice touch.

To submit a photo for the Art of Transit, post it to Metro’s Flickr group, email it to sourcemetro@gmail.com or Tweet it to @metrolosangeles with an #artoftransit hashtag. Many of the photos we’ve featured can be seen in these galleries on Flickr.

The art of transit

photo by Leonard Deschampe, via submission

Nice photo of a train station in Tokyo. It was taken with a Sony digital camera with the tilt-shift — which makes the train appear miniaturized — effect applied using an iPad photo app.

To submit a photo for the Art of Transit, post it to Metro’s Flickr group, email it to sourcemetro@gmail.com or Tweet it to @metrolosangeles with an #artoftransit hashtag. Many of the photos we’ve featured can be seen in these galleries on Flickr.

The art of transit

Photo by inc1979, via tumblr

 

Nice photo of the tunnel under the tracks at L.A. Union Station. The photo was taken with a Canon EOS 10D — a DSLR — with a shutter speed of three seconds, aperture of f/22 and 100 ISO.

To submit a photo for the Art of Transit, post it to Metro’s Flickr group, email it to sourcemetro@gmail.com or Tweet it to @metrolosangeles with an #artoftransit hashtag. Many of the photos we’ve featured can be seen in these galleries on Flickr.

The art of transit

photo by Thomas Leuthard, via Flickr

Nice shot — aptly titled “Hitchcock” — taken in Hamburg, Germany, earlier this year. The photo was taken with a Panasonic DMC-GF1 with a 1/64oth second shutter speed, aperture of f/1.7 and ISO of 100.

To submit a photo for the Art of Transit, post it to Metro’s Flickr group, email it to sourcemetro@gmail.com or Tweet it to @metrolosangeles with an #artoftransit hashtag. Many of the photos we’ve featured can be seen in these galleries on Flickr.

The art of transit

photo by floato, via Flickr

Nice silhouette of a train crossing a viaduct in the English countryside near Dentsdale. The photo was taken in 2007 with a Kodak C330 Zoom.

To submit a photo for the Art of Transit, post it to Metro’s Flickr group, email it to sourcemetro@gmail.com or Tweet it to @metrolosangeles with an #artoftransit hashtag. Many of the photos we’ve featured can be seen in these galleries on Flickr.