Transportation headlines, Wednesday, May 15

Here is a look at some of the transportation headlines gathered by us and the Metro Library. The full list of headlines is posted on the Library’s Headlines blog, which you can also access via email subscription or RSS feed.

Brown’s budget sends cap and trade funds to the black hole of the general fund (LA Streetsblog)

Excerpt:

When California passed it’s land-mark Greenhouse Gas reduction laws in 2006, residents and businesses were assured that funds raised through the controversial “cap and trade” program would be invested in programs and projects that would further reduce emissions. That promise is turning out to be a lot of hot air.

Some transportation advocates had hoped the money would be invested in mass transit, which is generally more efficient than vehicles carrying a single passenger.

Why we should never fine cyclists (The Atlantic Cities) 

As more bike infrastructure is added to many major cities, motorists are also pressuring police to enforce traffic laws equally to cyclists and vehicles. This greatly annoys the Atlantic Cities, which points out that most roads are still designed to benefit cars over bikes . Especially irksome, they say, are fines for cycling through empty intersections. I agree. Don’t get me started on bike routes through residential areas inflicted with four-way stop signs when, in fact, they should be two-way stop signs with the bike route not having to stop.

Atlanta Streetcar is cool but is it useful (Atlanta Journal-Constitution) 

ASC-Splash-Vision

Rendering: Atlanta Streetcar.

Transit planner Jarrett Walker has a good piece looking at Atlanta’s new 1.3-mile streetcar, one of many similar projects around the U.S. — all following in the footsteps of the infamous Portland Streetcar. Excerpt:

The Atlanta Streetcar line will be only 1.3 miles long from end to end, and a streetcar will come every 15 minutes if everything’s on time. So if you just missed one, should you really wait? Or should you just start walking?

It depends on your walking speed, but for most people, when going such a short distance, service every 15 minutes is just not worth waiting for. Start walking! You will often get to your destination before the streetcar comes.

As you walk, maybe the streetcar will overtake you and you can hop on. That’s nice, but notice what you’ve just proven. If you’re going to use the streetcar to get somewhere on time – a job, a meeting, a day care pickup – you have to allow enough time to walk the whole way. In that case, what has the streetcar accomplished?

Metro Board Planning Committee agenda change: congestion mitigation fee item withdrawn

I know there are a lot of folks who have been watching this item concerning a possible development impact fee program (here’s the staff report). It has been withdrawn from consideration from this month’s Board meetings and will likely be rescheduled soon.

For curious readers: items are frequently withdrawn from agendas and rescheduled for a whole host of reasons.


@Metrolosangeles Twitter Tuesday, May 14 edition

Welcome to Twitter Tuesday, our roundup of the latest Metro related tweets. To get our attention, add the #MetroLosAngeles tag to your tweets and subscribe to our feed if you haven’t already. For specific complaints and customer service, please use the Customer Comment Form on metro.net.


Transportation headlines, Tuesday, May 14: another look at young Americans driving less and bike sharing booms

Here is a look at some of the transportation headlines gathered by us and the Metro Library. The full list of headlines is posted on the Library’s Headlines blog, which you can also access via email subscription or RSS feed.

ART OF TRANSIT: Metro buses on Broadwayal, taken with the iPhone’s Hipstamatic app. Photo by Steve Hymon/Metro.


Young Americans lead trend toward less driving (New York Times)

The NYT looks at the Americans-are-driving less story through the prism of Charlotte, where light rail has proven popular and some people are definitely taking advantage of walkable, bikeable, transitable neighborhoods — and the mayor was recently appointed to be U.S. Secretary of Transportation.

Is it a trend that will last, asks the NYT. Some experts say probably not and that it’s inevitable that the milleniels will move to the ‘burbs and drive more once they have kids and/or better paying jobs. Fair point, I suppose, but I would have added this point: it may not be babies that drive people to the suburbs but rather a combination of babies + escalating real estate prices in popular walkable/bikeable/transitable urban areas.

A user’s guide to the L.A. mayoral race: 5 key differences between Garcetti and Greuel (LA Weekly)

Reporter Gene Maddeus writes a very well-informed piece that I think deftly and fairly looks at both candidates (I covered the L.A. City Council between 2005 and 2007). A section on development is the closest the article comes to looking at issues involving transportation.

Dozens of U.S. cities board the bike-sharing bandwagon (Earth Policy Institute)

A good look at the booming popularity of bike sharing programs in the U.S., which offer short-term bike rentals to urban dwellers. A big test of the concept will come this year as more big cities put their programs online. Check out this nifty chart:

The bike share criticism challenge (Brooklyn Spoke) 

New York City has been installing its bike sharing stations and suddenly complaints have soared whereas there was almost none when bike sharing was just a concept. See this New York Times story. The Brooklyn Spoke blog, however, offers a great visual rebuttal to most of the complaints, vividly showing that automobiles should be generating the same kind of complaints.


Transportation headlines, Monday, May 13

Here is a look at some of the transportation headlines gathered by us and the Metro Library. The full list of headlines is posted on the Library’s Headlines blog, which you can also access via email subscription or RSS feed.

Laurie Becklund on transactional planning in Hollywood (The Planning Report) 

The Hollywood Hills resident wants to see development in her end of Hollywood but has a lot of issues — issues she wants studied further — with the Millenium Hollywood skyscrapers being proposed near the Hollywood/Vine Red Line station. The gist of it: she thinks the project is too large and will greatly harm traffic in the area. Thoughts, readers?

Extreme commuter: UCLA staffer commutes 22 miles from Valley to campus (UCLA Today) 

Good post for the first day of Bike to Work Week.

Opinion: Metro must keep faith on Gold Line (San Gabriel Valley Tribune) 

Two members of the Foothill Extension Construction Authority Board say that Metro must commit $950 million to complete the Gold Line to Claremont instead of just funding it to Azusa as part of Measure R. I think it’s important to understand that Measure R doesn’t fully fund all of the Measure R transit projects or the more expensive alternatives of those projects. For example, outside money will be needed to complete the Airport Metro Connector, the Regional Connector, the Sepulveda Pass Transit Corridor and the light rail alternative for the East San Fernando Valley Transit Corridor.

Transportation headlines, Friday, May 10

Here is a look at some of the transportation headlines gathered by us and the Metro Library. The full list of headlines is posted on the Library’s Headlines blog, which you can also access via email subscription or RSS feed.

CicLAvia: iconic Wilshire Boulevard (CicLAvia) 

map_062313_8-5350.5x11_FINAL-5350

I predict big crowds for this one — go early for better cycling! The June 23 event will be easily accessed from Metro’s Red and Purple Line subway.

Lower bus fares? One transit agency is considering it (GOOD)

AC Transit is studying a possible 10 cent reduction from $2.10 to $2, a more common fare among large transit agencies; AC Transit runs bus service in Alameda and Contra Costa counties in the Bay Area.

The article also has this excerpt:

The agency will also look into other cost-saving alternatives, like getting rid of paper transfers in favor of day passes. AC Transit says abuses of paper transfers, like re-using or selling them, are a source of lost revenue. Other proposals include increasing the automated transit pass Clipper Card network and reducing the cost of a monthly pass.

That line of reasoning contributed to Metro getting rid of transfers and instead going with day passes. Not mentioned here is that making those who transfer pay more is extremely unpopular among riders — and perhaps impacts ridership.

Transit commuters are stinking low-lifes, Subaru tells commuters (Streetsblog) 

metro1

As the Streetsblog post explains, the above ad ran in a Canadian newspaper and conveniently fails to mention the joy of sitting in traffic, smog, climate change, etc. I own a 2007 Subaru and it’s a great car, but the idiots who came up with this ad overlooked another reality: some customers use their 2007 Subarus to drive to transit stops.

Transportation headlines, Thursday, May 9

Here is a look at some of the transportation headlines gathered by us and the Metro Library. The full list of headlines is posted on the Library’s Headlines blog, which you can also access via email subscription or RSS feed.

Delays, costs build up for 405 project (L.A. Times) 

A good look at the various issues that have delayed completion of the project that is adding a northbound carpool lane to the 405 between the 10 and 101 as well as widening bridges and rebuilding the on- and off-ramps to/from Wilshire Boulevard. Excerpt:

The 405 project is being built under a speedier-than-typical process. State lawmakers fast-tracked the construction by choosing the so-called “design-build” method over the more traditional “design-bid-build.”

Design-build puts a single contractor in charge of final design and construction, in theory enabling projects to run more smoothly and to be completed at lower cost.

Shaving years off the project “saves hundreds of millions of dollars in construction impacts, costs and travel delays for the public,” said Dave Sotero, a Metro spokesman.

But there can be downsides to this approach.

Some tasks that normally would be completed before the bulldozers and pile drivers move in — such as relocating utility lines — must be completed while construction is underway. Nasty surprises can derail plans.

In addition to the utility relocations, other problems have involved retaining walls and securing a property easement to build ramps from Getty Center Drive. The project is scheduled to be completed by mid-2014 with some parts of it opening prior. That’s a year behind the original schedule but seven years ahead of the 2021 completion date if design-build had not been used.

Crenshaw Subway Coalition gets ready for Leimert Park station showdown (Los Angeles Wave) 

A rendering from the Crenshaw/LAX Line's final environmental document showing the light rail running at grade between 48th and 59th.

A rendering from the Crenshaw/LAX Line’s final environmental document showing the light rail running at grade between 48th and 59th.

An update on a recent community meeting by the group fighting to add a Leimert Park station to the Crenshaw/LAX Line and have the segment between 48th and 59th streets put underground (as approved it will be built at street level). The article also included the Coalition’s update on what the Los Angeles mayoral candidates have written to the Coalition. Excerpt:

“As soon as possible upon taking office as mayor [I commit to directing] staff to review the design options in the [Environmental Impact Report/Statement] as well as funding opportunities for underground portions of Crenshaw Blvd between 48th and 59th streets,” Greuel wrote.

Meanwhile, Garceti declared: “As mayor, I will continue to aggressively fight for the rail stop in Leimert Park to improve safety, create jobs, boost local businesses and provide better access to a transportation option that will help South L.A. residents get where they need to go without a car, which will reduce congestion and pollution for us all.”

Bids to build the project are scheduled to be released soon by Metro, as well as a Metro staff recommendation for who should be awarded the contract. At this point, the earliest the Board would consider that contract is in late June; Garcetti or Greuel will take office on July 1. The Board has already approved adding a Leimert Park station if it could be built within the project’s budget. Putting the segment south of 48th Street underground is a bigger deal because that’s not the project approved that was approved by the Board or put out to bid, nor was it the project approved by the Federal Transit Administration in late 2011. Stay tuned!

L.A. Council approves controversial rail yard for port complex (L.A. Times) 

Cargo ships on the Panama Canal in a 2008 photo. Credit: ThinkPanama, via Flickr creative commons.

Cargo ships on the Panama Canal in a 2008 photo. Credit: ThinkPanama, via Flickr creative commons.

The 153-acre facility in Wilmington would allow more cargo containers to be transfered from trucks to Burlington Northern Santa Fe trains closer to the ports. Proponents say it would vastly reduce truck trips on the nearby 710 freeway and that it will be the greenest facility of its kind. Opponents counter that the yard will spew more pollution into the area and have threatened to sue. Looming over the entire issue is the widening of the Panama Canal, which may or may not (depending on who is doing the predicting) inspire the largest cargo ships from Asia to bypass the West Coast and instead unload at harbors along the Gulf of Mexico and the East Coast.

Has high-speed rail been derailed? (Governing) 

A good, balanced article on federal funding of President Obama’s initiative to build high-speed rail lines around the U.S. As the article notes, the $42 billion needed from the feds to build a San Francisco-to-Los Angeles line seems unlikely to come from the current Congress given recent budget cuts. But proponents point to smaller projects around the country that are speeding up existing Amtrak lines and say high-speed rail is much like the interstate highway system — it will be done in increments.