Transportation headlines, Friday, June 6

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A media event was held Friday morning at Metro's Division 13 facility to promote cap-and-trade efforts in the state and the regional benefits of reducing greenhouse gases. Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas is at the podium in the above photo. Behind him, from left, are Senator Kevin de Leon,  Senate President pro Tempore Darrell Steinberg, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and Metro Board Chair Diane DuBois. Photo by Luis Inzunza/Metro.

A media event was held Friday morning at Metro’s Division 13 facility to promote cap-and-trade efforts in the state and the regional benefits of reducing greenhouse gases and raising money for transit and other clean energy programs. Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas is at the podium in the above photo. Behind him, from left, are Senator Kevin de Leon, Senate President pro Tempore Darrell Steinberg, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and Metro Board Chair Diane DuBois. Photo by Luis Inzunza/Metro.

Kern County votes to sue over high-speed rail review (Bakersfield Californian) 

The Kern County Board of Supervisors voted 4 to 1 to file a state lawsuit alleging the environmental impact report for the bullet train project did not adequately study the impacts and mitigations on the route between Fresno and Bakersfield. The city of Bakersfield is also planning to file a similar suit. The city has taken issue with the proposed route through town for the train, alleging it’s too disruptive to existing buildings and roads. The county is also one of the plaintiffs in an ongoing suit alleging the project is not properly using voter-approved state bond money.

Gold Line Extension to Claremont left off funding list by MTA (San Gabriel Valley Tribune)

Officials in the San Gabriel Valley want a planned segment of the Gold Line from Azusa to Montclair to be included in the short-range plan to be considered by the Metro Board this summer. The only transit projects listed in the plan — which covers the next decade — are those that have funding from Measure R. Of course, what gets built over the next decade or so could change, depending on whether the Metro Board seeks a ballot measure in 2016 to accelerate and/or build more transit projects.

Expo adjacent mall rising quick, signing leases (Curbed LA)

The new mall — to be called The Platform — is across the street from the Culver City station on the site of old auto dealerships. One of the new tenants is Blue Bottle Coffee for you coffee nerds out there. Nice to finally see some development in Culver City near the train station. There has been a lot of talk but not much action in recent times.

Brazil Metro on strike one week before World Cup (AP)

The opening game is June 12 in Sao Paulo, perhaps the reason that transit workers in Sao Paulo went on strike Thursday. Naturally, the easiest and best way for fans to reach the game is by train. Not all workers left the job — but enough did to cripple the system, despite a judge’s orders not to strike. In related news, if you have HBO watch the segment on Real Sports about countries that build stadiums for the World Cup and Olympics and what happens to those facilities after. Short answer: white elephants.

Have fun at tomorrow afternoon’s game, Kings fans. Staples Center is easily reachable via the Pico Station shared by the Blue Line and Expo Line. As for the above photo…it’s nice to see the Rangers making a beer league mistake, leaving Kings winger Justin Forward alone in the high slot — the exact place from which you never want the other team shooting on your goal.

 

Transportation headlines, Thursday, June 5

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Congress detours from common sense on the Highway Trust Fund (Washington Post) 

The editorial takes a dim view of lack of efforts to keep the Fund funded. Excerpt:

BOTH PARTIES want to do nothing but squabble before this year’s election. Not much will stop them — except, perhaps, this dose of reality: If political point-scoring is all they accomplish over the next several weeks, work on the nation’s roads, bridges and rails will come to a halt.

The federal Highway Trust Fund is set to run out of money this summer. Without a fix, federally backed transportation projects all over the country — not just highways — would be in danger of severe disruption or cancellation. That translates into high costs now to stop and restart projects once funding comes through, higher costs in the future as contractors build the risk of funding holdups into their prices, downward pressure on construction jobs and unnecessary delay for anyone who uses the infrastructure. Failing to shore up the fund in time would be plain legislative malfeasance.

The Post thinks two obvious funding sources would be a higher federal gas tax or a vehicle mileage fee. The current federal gas tax is 18.4 cents per gallon and hasn’t been raised since 1993.

America’s invisible trolley system (Newsweek) 

A look at some of the many light rail projects that have been proposed across the U.S. but never built for a variety of reasons. Perhaps the most interesting paragraph in the article:

Compared with Europeans, Ross says, ”Americans have much greater interest in sorting out different people of different incomes into different neighborhoods.” When it comes to mass transit, he says, “the classic argument is that it’s gonna bring crime. The fashionable one right now is that it will gentrify our neighborhood and make poor people suffer. I’ve seen people make both of these arguments in the same paragraph.”

San Francisco transit workers call in sick for a third day (San Francisco Chronicle) 

About 70 percent of the San Francisco Muni’s bus and rail service was running Wednesday — an improvement over the previous two days. Union workers rejected a new contract last Friday that they said would result in a pay cut. At this time, the union isn’t allowed to strike but members are allowed to call in sick.

 

I-5 full freeway and ramp closures June 9 to June 13

Here’s the press release from Caltrans:

Caltrans will conduct overnight full directional freeway closures nightly June 9 through Friday, June 13 on the northbound Santa Ana Freeway (Interstate 5) from Valley View Avenue to Carmenita Road. The closures also include the on-ramps at Artesia Blvd, Alondra Blvd., and Firestone Blvd.  Similar full directional freeway closures on southbound I-5 are scheduled for  June 18 to 20, plus a closed connector from southbound I-605 to southbound I-5.

The work involves removing falsework, the wood structural support for the new Alondra Boulevard Bridge.  The 57-year-old Alondra Boulevard Bridge was completely demolished in June 2013; the new bridge, and the Freeway Drive/Alondra Blvd. intersection is scheduled to reopen later this summer.

Northbound ONLY I-5 Full Freeway Closures:  Nightly, Monday, June 9  through Friday, June 13

N/B I-5 On-ramps Closed:     Nightly, 11 p.m. to  4 a.m.at Artesia Blvd., Alondra Blvd., and Firestone Blvd.

N/B Full Freeway Closure:  Nightly, 11:59 p.m. to 4 a.m. from  Valley View Ave. to Carmenita Road.

Southbound ONLY I-5 Full Freeway Closures: Nightly, Wed. June 18;  Thurs. 6/19; and Fri. 6/20

S/B I-5 On-ramps Closed:     Nightly, 11 p.m. to  4 a.m.at Carmenita Road and Alondra Blvd,.

S/B Full Freeway Closure:  Nightly, 11:59 p.m. to 4 a.m. from  Carmenita Road to Valley View Ave.

Connector Closure: southbound I-605 connector to S/B I-5 will be closed from 11:59 p.m. to 5 a.m.

The construction work and schedule is weather-permitting and subject to change.  The Alondra Boulevard Bridge Project is a $110 million project to construct one carpool and one general purpose lane in each direction, from North Fork Coyote Creek Bridge to Marquardt Avenue, reconstruct overcrossings at Alondra Boulevard and North Fork Coyote Creek, and realign and upgrade adjacent frontage roads. The bridge is being widened from a four-lane to a six-lane bridge, with three lanes in each direction, and longer to accommodate a wider freeway. The Alondra Project is scheduled to complete in mid-to-late 2015. The contractor is C.C. Myers, Inc. of Anaheim, Ca.

The construction is part of the $1.8 billion Santa Ana Freeway (I-5) South Corridor Improvement Projects to construct one carpool and one general purpose lane in each direction from the Los Angeles/Orange County line to Interstate 605.

The motoring public, residents and businesses are encouraged to sign-up to receive notifications on street, lane and ramp closures by calling the toll-free I-5 South Corridor Improvement Projects information line (855) 454-6335 or visiting www.I-5info.com

New Reduced Speed Limit              “Slow for the Cone Zone”

The posted speed limit along the I-5 South Corridor, from the Los Angeles/Orange County line to Interstate 605, has been reduced from 65 miles per hour to 55 mph. Signs have been posted alerting motorists that traffic fines are doubled in highway construction work zones.  Please refrain from driving while talking, texting, browsing or other distractions. It’s Not Worth It.

 

Transportation headlines, Wednesday, June 4

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A 'CPR Block Party' was held by the EduLife Institute at five Metro Rail stations on Tuesday, including Union Station. The idea was to train as many people as possible in CPR, a very good cause. Photo by Steve Hymon/Metro.

ART OF TRANSIT: A ‘CPR Block Party’ was held by the EduLife Institute at five Metro Rail stations on Tuesday, including Union Station. The idea was to train as many people as possible in CPR, a very good cause. Photo by Steve Hymon/Metro.

DTLA businesses semi-win lawsuit against Regional Connector (Curbed LA)

The U.S. District Court ruled last week that work on the project is allowed to continue but that Metro must amend the final environmental document to explain why the agency is using cut-and-cover tunneling methods — and not other methods of tunneling — on Flower Street between Fifth and Seventh streets. Here is Metro’s statement:

Metro is pleased the Court upheld its analyses and mitigation of the environmental impacts of the Regional Connector Project. In the one area that requires further environmental documentation to explain why alternative tunneling methods on lower Flower Street are infeasible, Metro will follow the Court’s directive to meet and confer with the Plaintiffs and to file a joint report by June 20, 2014 regarding Plaintiffs’ request for injunctive relief. Metro will continue to provide the public with information on the infeasibility of alternative tunneling methods for the lower Flower Street portion of the Regional Connector Project through the environmental review process.”

 

And here is the court ruling:

Primary election results narrow candidates for Metro Board (L.A. County Registrar)

Each of the five Los Angeles County Supervisors are guaranteed seats on the Metro Board of Directors, the 13-member board that has the final say over agency policies, budgets and projects. In the two races to replace term-limited Gloria Molina and Zev Yaroslavsky, the field of candidates has been narrowed. In the first district currently represented by Molina, Hilda Solis captured more than 50 percent of the vote and won, according to unofficial results. In the third district represented by Yaroslavsky, Sheila Kuehl and Bobby Shriver were the two top vote-getters.

In the 33rd Congressional district, where the route of the Purple Line Extension under Beverly Hills High School was briefly an issue, the finalists are Elan Carter and Ted Lieu.

Union Station plans would alter and preserve (LAObserved) 

LAObserved editor Kevin Roderick moderates a panel discussion last week at the Los Angeles Public Library on the history and future of iconic Union Station. It’s appropriate: the station just celebrated its 75th anniversary in early May and this week new details were released by Metro on the emerging Union Station Master Plan, which seeks to preserve the historic nature of the station and add improvements to serve growing crowds of riders who use the station. Here’s a podcast of the event.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti paves the way for ‘Great Streets’ (Daily News) 

The mayor on Tuesday announced 15 sections of streets in the city — one per council district — that will get refurbished to attract more pedestrians. The Daily News talks to council members representing the San Fernando Valley and they’re in agreement something needs to be done to attract more businesses to the area. The project has an initial budget of $800,000.

Just how great will those great streets become? That’s the question that Joe Linton asks at Streetsblog LA. He is skeptical — but hopeful — believing it takes more than upgraded signs and shrubbery to make an area shine again.

Evaluating protected bike lanes in the U.S. (National Institute for Transportation and Communities)

This long and academic-minded report comes to the not-surprising conclusion that protected bike lanes in six cities evaluated attract increase bike traffic fairly quickly. And those who already bike, tend to bike more often using the routes.

*******

Game One of the Stanley Cup Finals between the Kings and New York Rangers is this afternoon at 5 p.m. at Staples Center, one block from the Pico Station shared by the Blue Line and Expo Line. Have fun, Kings fans and welcome to the Best Coast, Rangers fans! Say your respective prayers. We like the Kings in five games.

 

Transportation headlines, Tuesday, June 3

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Metro unveils bold proposal to modernize Union Station (L.A. Times) 

Good overview of some of the details Metro released yesterday on the emerging Union Station Master Plan, which seeks to add an expanded concourse, widened rail platforms, a relocated bus plaza and new development. A community meeting will be held Thursday evening from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Metro headquarters (no RVSP required) in the Board room. Our post from yesterday also has renderings.

Downtown institutions battle over having name on Expo Line station (Downtown News)

The 23rd Street station is near both the Orthopaedic Institute for Children and the Los Angeles Trade-Technical College — and both want their names on the station. The issue will eventually land before the Metro Board of Directors.

L.A. Mayor identifies city’s ‘Great Streets’ (L.A. Times)

Mayor Eric Garcetti this morning is announcing the sections of 15 streets in the city — one in each council district — that are to get an extensive makeover. The city has $800,000 budgeted for the program. Metro has busy bus lines on all the streets, btw, and some sections are near existing or future rail stations.

In related news, an appeal of the MyFigueroa plan by an auto dealer has been withdrawn, according to StreetsblogLA. That should clear the way for pedestrian and cycling improvements on the street, as well as new bus stops.

Park Mile fretting over plan for 48 little houses (Curbed LA)

Another development dispute, this time involving the Farmers Insurance campus on Wilshire Boulevard. It was purchased by the developer CIM who wants to subdivide it and build 48 homes on the site after the insurance workers move to another office. Wilshire is a busy transit corridor, of course, and it will be interesting to see how the homes are designed to fit into the fabric of the existing neighborhood of single-family homes.

Academy to pay LACMA $36 million for movie museum lease (L.A. Times) 

The Academy of Motion Pictures and Sciences will pay the money up front and then have a 108-year lease for its planned museum at the corner of Wilshire and Fairfax. Which is conveniently located near two busy bus corridors and the future Purple Line Extension’s station at Wilshire and Fairfax! LACMA also some big plans for the eastern side of its campus.

Wilshire/La Brea Customer Center closes on June 20 for move to new location

Due to future Purple Line Extension construction, the Wilshire/La Brea Customer Center will be closing and moving to a new location. The customer center will close on Friday, June 20, and reopen at the Red/Purple Line’s Wilshire/Vermont station on Tuesday, July 1. The Lost and Found will relocate and be near the Gold Line’s Heritage Square Station. It will also open on July 1.

The new addresses are as follows:

  • Wilshire/Vermont Customer Center: 3183 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 174, Los Angeles, CA, 90010
  • Heritage Square Station Lost and Found: 3571 Pasadena Avenue, Los Angeles, CA, 90031

Transportation headlines, Monday, June 2

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If you’re a hockey fan and lucky enough to be attending the Stanley Cup Finals on Wednesday and Saturday afternoon, the Pico Station shared by the Blue and Expo Lines is one block from Staples Center. Maps and timetables here.

L.A. is still car crazy and we shouldn’t apologize for that (LA Weekly) 

The essay and reality check by Dennis Romero is in response to a statement in the L.A. Times that L.A.’s love affair with the car is over — a statement that slipped out in response to the Purple Line Extension securing $2 billion from a federal grant and loan. If you consider that more than 80 percent of L.A.’s commuters use vehicles to reach work and the fact that L.A. remains a significant hub of auto imports and design, Dennis has a point :) This is not an anti-transit article, by the way. I like these two graphs:

You needn’t be a Luddite or pig to embrace our love affair with cars, either. Vehicles are evolving at an amazing pace, and you can still be a “car guy” (or girl) and environmentally conscious at the same time.

Don’t get us started on all the rich Westsiders with power-sucking McMansions who think they’re doing their part by driving Priuses. You don’t have to be this kind of hypocrite to dig cars nowadays.

I just took a few days off and drove to the Eastern Sierra and back in my car. So I have about zero moral authority to argue with Dennis. That said, I left my car parked in Pasadena this morning and took the Gold Line to work. Yes, I still drive. But I drive less than I used to :)

Speaking of the Eastern Sierra, here's a place served only by foot. Let's see if any readers can name that lake. Bonus points for naming the peak behind it. Photo by Steve Hymon.

Speaking of the Eastern Sierra, here’s a place served only by foot. Let’s see if any readers can name that lake. Bonus points for naming the peak behind it. Photo by Steve Hymon.

When will the Las Vegas monorail expand to the airport? (Las Vegas Review Journal) 

There has been some very preliminary talk about connecting the monorail — which serves the Strip — to the busy airport. But nothing firm yet, although officials say the cab industry won’t hold up an airport monorail if it should come to pass. Because, you know, Las Vegas is such a virtuous place politically speaking :)

Fil-Am appointed as L.A. Board of Transportation commissioner (Asian Journal) 

Metro’s Cris B. Liban, executive officer for the Environmental Compliance and Services Department was appointed by Mayor Garcetti as one of the commissioners for the L.A. Board of Transportation. Cris, btw, is someone who most definitely practices what he preaches.

Legal challenge seeks to stop L.A. from demolishing historic bridge (L.A. Times) 

Cycling and open space advocates are seeking to stop the city of Los Angeles from demolishing the old Riverside Drive bridge, which is being replaced with a new structure. They want the bridge to be used as park space and to help provide a cycling connection between the east and west sides of the Los Angeles River. City officials says that keeping the old bridge would require retrofitting and would add to the cost and timeline for completing the new one.

Boxer: transportation bill ‘unworkable’ (The Hill) 

A new proposal from House Republicans to pay for a short-term transportation bill with cuts to the Postal Service is not earning rave reviews from California Senator Barbara Boxer. The current multi-year transportation funding bill expires this year and Congress has been struggling — to say it politely — to come up with a new bill that governs federal transpo spending in the coming years.