The art of transit

Photo by Jeff Johnston, via Flickr

A very nice image and of the Hollywood and Highland station on the Red Line subway. Great use of symmetry.

To submit a photo or photos of something transportation-related, post them to Metro’s Flickr group or email them to sourcemetro@gmail.com. The photos we’ve featured can be seen in these galleries on Flickr. Or click on the ‘art of transit’ below.

The art of transit

photo by neighborhoods.org, via Flickr

Nice photo of one of the more unique transit projects in the U.S. — the Portland aerial tram connecting the South Waterfront and Marquam Hill campuses of Oregon Health & Science University.

To submit a photo or photos of something transportation-related, post them to Metro’s Flickr group or email them to sourcemetro@gmail.com. The photos we’ve featured can be seen in these galleries on Flickr. Or click on the ‘art of transit’ below.


The art of transit

A hat tip to reader Nicole for sending over this old clip — a 1912 vision of Los Angeles that never quite came to pass. Unless, perhaps, one of those train things is an early vision of the Regional Connector. Also, where’s all the parking lots in the artist’s rendering?

To submit a photo or photos of something transportation-related, post them to Metro’s Flickr group or email them to sourcemetro@gmail.com. The photos we’ve featured can be seen in these galleries on Flickr.

The art of transit

photo by Faria, via Flickr

A nicely exposed and framed shot of the Red Line’s Vermont and Sunset station, with its starscape murals. As noted on the photo’s Flickr page, on weekends subway passengers can exit the train at this stop and access the city of L.A.’s DASH bus to the nearby Griffith Observatory.

To submit a photo or photos of something transportation-related, post them to Metro’s Flickr group or email them to sourcemetro@gmail.com. The photos we’ve featured can be seen in these galleries on Flickr.

The art of transit

photo by Mike Black, via Flickr

This is one of the best photos I’ve seen of people-less stairs and an escalator in a train station — in this case the Braid SkyTrain station in the Vancouver area.

To submit a photo or photos of something transportation-related, post them to Metro’s Flickr group or email them to sourcemetro@gmail.com. The photos we’ve featured can be seen in these galleries on Flickr.

The art of transit


Click above to see a larger image.

photos by Fernando “Andres” Di Zitti, via submission

One of our favorite Metro interns captured these images recently from Metro headquarters, which offers great vistas of Los Angeles from its Union Station-adjacent location.

By the way, submissions of the local transit and transportation scene have been a little slow lately, but I’m not giving up on this feature. Keep in mind that my definition of “transit” remains loose. Take some photos, people!

To submit a photo or photos of something transportation-related, post them to Metro’s Flickr group or email them to sourcemetro@gmail.com. The photos we’ve featured can be seen in these galleries on Flickr.

The art of transit

photo by Joel Epstein, via submission

Los Angeles transit advocate and writer Joel Epstein took this image on a recent trip abroad. See if you can guess the city — the answer is posted after the jump.

To submit a photo or photos of something transportation-related, post them to Metro’s Flickr group or email them to sourcemetro@gmail.com. The photos we’ve featured can be seen in these galleries on Flickr. Continue reading

The art of transit

And now for something completely different…


Video by Graeme Taylor, via Straylight

I really appreciate the effect achieved by Mr. Taylor for its ability to slow down the chaotic blur that the world often seems to be from the seat of a train.  I’ll let him explain how he achieved it.

The ‘trick’ is the camera collects images at a rate of 210 per second – but the film is played back at 30 frames per second. So, every seven seconds of footage that you watch corresponds to 1 real second. At least at the start, one real second is plenty of time for someone to move into, then out of, the camera’s field of view, but isn’t enough time for them to really do much: hence, the frozen effect.

To submit a photo or photos of something transportation-related, post them to Metro’s Flickr group or email them to sourcemetro@gmail.com. The photos we’ve featured can be seen in these galleries on Flickr.