Fresh, healthy and delicious – Go Metro to farmers’ markets!

farmers' market mapInstead of driving to a supermarket, reduce your carbon footprint even more by going Metro to a farmers’ market! This new interactive map makes taking transit to farmers’ markets easier than ever.

Mayor Aja Brown visits with vendors at the Blue LIine Farmers' Market.

Compton Mayor Aja Brown visits with vendors at the Blue Line Farmers’ Market.

Support local farmers and keep your kitchen stocked with fresh, seasonal fruits and veggies; see if there’s a market near you. Don’t forget, the Blue Line Farmers’ Market offers a 10% discount to those who present their TAP cards! And The WALL farmers’ market in the DTLA Fashion District offers free entrance to the Flower Market (and more) to Metro riders.

If there’s a farmers’ market you frequent via Metro that you think should be on the map, let us know in the comments.

 

What do you do on your way to work? If you rideshare, the answer is…

…a lot! Because instead of driving, you can use the time to check email, sleep, read, connect with your neighborhood and more.

And don’t forget, during California Rideshare Week, Oct. 6 through 10, Metro will be issuing Get Out of Traffic Licenses to commuters who qualify* at four Metro stations and at the Civic Center Clean Air/Rideshare Fair. To receive a Get Out of Traffic License, be ready to take a photo at any of the following locations:

  • Monday, Oct. 6 from 8 – 10 a.m. at Union Station East Portal
  • Tuesday, Oct. 7 from 8 -9 a.m. at Culver City Station
  • Wednesday, Oct. 8 from 8 – 9 a.m. at North Hollywood Station
  • Thursday, Oct. 9 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Civic Center Clean Air/Rideshare Fair at Los Angeles Grand Park
  • Friday, Oct. 10 from 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. at El Monte Station

*You qualify if you have tried/will try carpooling, vanpooling, taking transit, walking or bicycling to work!

During Rideshare Week, commuters also will have a chance to win great prizes by pledging to share the ride online at metro.net/rideshareweek. Pledging to rideshare even just one day out of the week will enter you in the raffle. Keep reading after the jump to see what some of the prizes are.

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What to expect from Metro Bus and Rail during CicLAvia this Sunday

CicLAvia - October 5, 2014

CicLAvia, presented by Metro, returns this Sunday with more streets to explore sans vehicular traffic. Heart of LA will be open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and feature brand new hubs in Echo Park, the Broadway Theatre district, Boyle Heights and East L.A.!

Though some of the route is new this time around, it’s as easy as ever to Go Metro to CicLAvia. The event is accessible via–count em’–11 Metro Rail stations, and bikes/skateboards/rollerblades/etc. are welcome, provided some rules are observed (more on that to follow).

What can customers expect of bus and rail service during CicLAvia? Metro Rail will follow the regular Sunday schedule on October 5, but with longer, rush hour-length trains during the event and through the evening to accommodate extra bikes, boards, and people.

On the bus side, street closures will impact Metro Bus routes beginning at 6 a.m. until approximately 5 p.m. the day of the event. Though the Heart of LA course has numerous crossing points for vehicular traffic, Metro customers should expect bus detours and delays, including temporary bus stop relocations along the route. Impacted Metro Bus lines include: 2, 4, 10, 16, 18, 20, 28, 30, 40, 45, 51, 53, 55, 60, 62, 66, 68, 70, 71, 76, 78, 83, 92, 96, 460, 487, 720, 733, 745 and Metro Silver Line.

For more information about detours on specific lines, visit Metro’s CicLAvia Service Advisory page and scroll to the bottom.

By the way, if you have your valid TAP card, receive 15% off official CicLAvia shirts at the East LA Civic Center hub!

Also, please remember that bike etiquette in the station and on the train is even more important during a crowded event like CicLAvia. Cyclists planning to go Metro to the route, please review and observe the following rules:

  • When boarding, use entire platform length for more seating and bike space availability. Large groups should separate and enter through different doors to reduce crowding and delays.
  • Board with bikes using doors marked with yellow decals.
  • Always walk your bike within Metro stations or on trains.
  • For everyone’s safety, do not bring bikes on escalators; use the stairs or elevators instead.
  • Elevator priority will be given to passengers with disabilities.
  • Do not use emergency exit gates at turnstiles except during emergencies or unless directed by law enforcement or Metro personnel.
  • Observe all Bikes on Metro guidelines.

Like Metro, CicLAvia offers an alternative way to connect with our wonderful city and each other. To all who attend, have a fun and safe time–if you snap any good bikes-on-transit photos this Sunday, tweet us @metrolosangeles or tag us on Instagram @metrolosangeles! And for those who arrive via our buses and trains: thanks for going Metro.

Metrolink’s Angels Express will run for playoff games beginning Thursday

Photo by Ray Smith, via Flickr creative commons.

Photo by Ray Smith, via Flickr creative commons.

The American League West champion Angels open the division series at home on Thursday against the Kansas City Royals, who won a thriller wild card game on Tuesday night.

Thursday’s game is scheduled for 6:00 p.m. and Game 2 on Friday is 6:30 p.m.

Metrolink’s Angels Express will be running for the post-season with train service between Los Angeles Union Station and the ballpark in Anaheim with stops at Norwalk, Buena Park and Fullerton — there will also be trains between Oceanside and Anaheim. The train station is in the parking lot for the stadium (beyond left field) and is a short walk from the ballpark.

Please click here for schedules. Round-trip is $7 for adults, $6 for seniors/disabled and $4 for those aged six to 18. Kids five and under are free with a limit of three free sprouts per paying adult.

 

Happy Walktober!

It’s that time of year again, when pumpkin spice takes over the land and the air starts to feel just a little bit crisp. Hard pass on the pumpkin spice (eggnog only, thanks!), but I do plan on enjoying the cooling fresh air with a lot more walking…especially as it’s Walktober!

During the month of October, get out and add a few more steps to your day. Not only will it be good for your health, it’s a great way to explore and connect with your neighborhood and other transit options, reduce your carbon footprint…and it could change your daily commute for the better.

Commuter Ryan Long walks to his Metrolink station so early in the morning, it's still dark out!

Commuter Ryan Long walks to his Metrolink station so early in the morning, it’s still dark out!

Don’t take our word for it! Here’s Ryan Long, who commutes via walking and train ride from Lancaster to downtown Los Angeles every day:

“The early morning walk to the train station for me starts at 4:30 a.m. Living in Lancaster, I see rabbits, coyotes, lizards and many other cool walks of life along the way. A short 12-minute walk is a great way to stay fit and clear my mind. I exercise daily, and this is a great jumpstart. I arrive at the station and am greeted by a lovely church group that hands out donuts and coffee for free! How great! The two-hour ride from Lancaster to Union Station provides me with time to sleep. My coworkers poke fun at me, thinking I am greatly inconvenienced by making this trip. They do not know that I get an extra four hours of sleep per day! I can also catch up on my books, movies and television shows! I have met many great people along the way and would not trade this for the stressful car drive ever again.”

Ryan shared his story with us when pledging to share the ride, and you should pledge too, for a chance to have your story featured on The Source (and the chance to win some awesome prizes).

Want to get walking but not sure where to start? CicLAvia is just around the corner, and all walkers are welcome. So as tempting as it is to spend the entire weekend marathoning Gilmore Girls on Netflix…break out the walking shoes and put those feet in gear!

Zocalo Public Square tackles the can-we-fix-traffic question at last night’s event

From left, UCLA's Brian Taylor, FAST's Hilary Norton, Metro CEO Art Leahy and KCRW's Kajon Cermac. Photo by Steve Hymon/Metro.

From left, UCLA’s Brian Taylor, FAST’s Hilary Norton, Metro CEO Art Leahy and KCRW’s Kajon Cermac. Photo by Steve Hymon/Metro.

Zocalo Public Square and Metro held a panel discussion Monday night at the Petersen Automotive Museum with an appropriate topic for the venue: what, if anything, can be done to speed up traffic in our region?

A podcast of the discussion is above. KCRW traffic reporter Kajon Cermac served as the moderator with the panel including Metro CEO Art Leahy, UCLA Director of Transportation Studies’ Brian Taylor and Hilary Norton, executive director of Fixing Angelenos Stuck in Traffic.

Can traffic be fixed or seriously improved? The short answer: probably not much can be done unless the region embraces drastic and politically unpopular measures such as heavier tolling across all lanes on freeways to reduce peak hour traffic, passing laws to greatly restrict driving, building many billions of dollars of new freeways (which includes the challenge of finding places to put them) or going the Detroit route by shedding jobs, residents and the local economy.

In other words, as UCLA’s Taylor put it, the status quo of traffic congestion is the least bad option for the politicians who frequently ask him how to fix traffic.

Which is not to say that things can’t be done to improve mobility and even some traffic.

Taylor praised the congestion pricing projects on freeways in our region (which Metro’s ExpressLanes on the 10 and 110) and said they are improving capacity and speeds in the toll lanes, as well as Metro’s Rapid Buses and the Orange Line. Norton pointed to the increasing number of people taking transit to big events.

And Leahy noted that thanks to Measure R, Metro is currently in the midst of the largest transit building boom in the nation (one that will include a subway station next door to both the Petersen and LACMA on Wilshire Boulevard’s Miracle Mile). He said the goal is to keep expanding the transit network and making it work better so that people can use it travel far and wide and get out of their cars.

The conversation covered a lot of ground and I’m interested in feedback and comments from those who listened or attended the event.

My three cents: I felt like it was a good, albeit brief, adult conversation about traffic and urban planning — and the fact that traffic is not something easily “fixed” without serious consequences. I also thought UCLA’s Brian Taylor did a good job pointing to the fact that a lot of the traffic stereotypes about our region are total bunk and that concentrating density around transit and high activity centers may not fix traffic — but often makes places nicer, happier places to live and visit.

 

 

“Bike to the Bowl” for the Pixies, Cat Power, and Gogol Bordello Sunday, Sept. 28

This Sunday, September 28, Metro, the Hollywood Bowl, and LA County Bicycle Coalition have teamed up to make it easy to “Bike to the Bowl” to see The Pixies, Cat Power, and Gogol Bordello!

Tickets are still available for the show, which begins at 7:30 p.m. with Cat Power. LACBC will be on hand at the Bowl’s Museum Patio to offer free, secure valet bike parking to those arriving on two wheels. The valet will be open from 5:30 to 10:30 p.m.

There are a few different ways to “Bike to the Bowl.” If you don’t want to make the entire trip by bike, connect to the Hollywood Bowl Shuttle (the ride is free with valid TAP card), or hop aboard the Metro Red Line, exit at Hollywood/Highland Station, and ride the rest of the way.

As a reward for your efforts, show your TAP card or bike valet ticket at the Museum Patio and receive a free scoop of ice cream, compliments of Peddler’s Creamery! Can you say sweet deal?

To find out more about LA County bike paths, lanes, routes, and racks, check out the Metro Bike Map.