Just installed! Nordhoff Station mosaic artwork

More artwork installations are happening on the Orange Line Extension, which is expected to open soon! A few photos of the 27-foot-long ellipses designed by Anne Marie Karlsen for Nordhoff Station are below. More information about the artwork is available here.

See images from the installations at Sherman Way and Canoga Stations.

Detail of twenty-seven foot long mosaic artwork installed at Nordhoff Station

 

Thousands of tiny pieces of hand-cut mosaics are installed at one of the new platforms at Nordhoff Station.

The second of two mosaic artworks installed at Nordhoff Station

 

Why You Ride: Bicycle Edition

To celebrate Bike Week LA, we’re publishing a Why You Ride series with the winners of the 2012 Golden Pedal Awards. The Golden Pedal Awards are Metro’s annual competition for great stories about commuting via bicycle. Our first winner is Jung Lee, a Metro intern who is seriously dedicated to biking to work.

Name: Jung Lee
Start:
Torrance, CA           
End: Union Station
Distance:
18 miles, one way
Time:
45 minutes

Photo courtesy of Jung Lee.

Jung commutes from Torrance to Union Station in downtown Los Angeles on his bicycle – an 18-mile ride. Clocking in at 45 minutes, his commute is as fast as it would be if he were driving during rush hour!

Jung was nominated by his colleague Joe Simpson, who writes:

“Jung is what I aspire to be someday. He arrives to work dripping wet and promptly cleans up for a very productive day. Because I’m a chicken, I ride the Santa Clarita bike paths on weekends, but Jung rides through traffic, over the hillside, on the river bikeways, and anywhere to get in to work. Sometimes he even does a workout ride before riding in. He doesn’t own a car and bikes EVERYWHERE. Very inspiring.”

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How do they do that? Train explosive sniffing dogs

Wilson. Photo by Anna Chen/Metro

How do they do that? is a series for The Source that explores the technology that helps keep Metro running and passengers and other commuters moving. Some of it applies directly to the trains, buses and freeways and some of it runs in the background — invisible to nearly everyone but essential to mobility in our region.

How do they do that? Train explosive sniffing dogs

Xxara is happy-go-lucky, always hungry and loves to play. No, we’re not talking playmate of the year … although in some circles she certainly would be considered.

Xxara is an explosives scent dog who works the Metro beat for the L.A. County Sheriff’s Department Canine Services Detail. It’s her job to search for explosives on Metro buses, trains and property. Or it will be, when she is fully trained. Currently the two-year-old black Lab retriever is acclimating to the kind of life she didn’t know at the TSA (Transportation Security Administration) training center at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas.

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Just installed! Sherman Way Station mosaic artwork

Artwork installation is moving forward on the Orange Line Extension! A few photos of the 27-foot-long ellipses designed by Margaret Lazzari for the Sherman Way Station are below. More information about the artwork is available here.

See images from the installation at Canoga Station here.

Detail of twenty-seven foot long mosaic artwork being installed at Sherman Way Station.

Thousands of tiny pieces of hand-cut mosaics are installed at one of the new platforms at Sherman Station.

 

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Willie Robert Middlebrook, Jr. 1957-2012

Willie Middlebrook at the installation of his artwork at Expo/Crenshaw Station.

It is with a heavy heart that we share the news of the passing of Willie Robert Middlebrook, Jr., just one week after the opening of the Metro Expo Line, featuring Middlebrook’s artwork at the Expo/Crenshaw Station.

Born in Detroit in 1957, Middlebrook relocated to Los Angeles in 1960. Over his lifetime, Middlebrook’s photographs and photo-painting portraits were exhibited in over 200 solo and group shows, including venues such as the Studio Museum of Harlem, Art Institute of Chicago, Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, Cleveland Museum of Art and the California African-American Museum.

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How do they do that? Cast Metro in movies, commercials and TV shows


How do they do that? is a series for The Source that explores the technology that helps keep Metro running and passengers and other commuters moving. Some of it applies directly to the trains, buses and freeways and some of it runs in the background — invisible to nearly everyone but essential to mobility in our region.

How do they do that? Cast Metro in movies, commercials and TV shows

The answer is that they don’t. The production companies come to Metro. Usually.

For the 2003 movie “The Italian Job” the film makers approached Metro and booked a shoot that lasted a few days at the Red Line Hollywood/Highland Station and the 7th/Metro Center Station.

In the completed film, a convoy of Mini Coopers (watch trailer) drives down the steps of the Hollywood/Highland Station and into the subway tunnel — a period of time that lasted only a few seconds in the movie but involved days of shooting. For the shoot, the stair railings had to be removed to accommodate the cars and the production company constructed false steps to protect the real ones from the pounding of the Mini Coopers, which were small but not exactly weightless.

Rather than ducking into the Hollywood/Highland subway tunnel as it appeared in the movie, the cars were filmed driving down the platform and onto the tracks at 7th/Metro Station because there was more room to maneuver. Also, a pursuing train that’s supposed to be the Red Line subway was actually a Blue Line where it runs underground just before emerging at Pico Station.

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Just installed! Canoga Station mosaic artwork

Artwork installation has begun on the Metro Orange Line Extension! A few shots of the 27-foot-long ellipses designed by Ken Gonzales-Day for the Canoga Station are below. More information about the artwork is available here.

Thousands of tiny pieces of hand-cut mosaics are installed at one of the new platforms at Canoga Station.

Twenty-seven foot long mosaic artworks are installed at Canoga Station.

How do they do that? Make roads smarter

Photo by Carl Greenlund/Metro

How do they do that? is a series for The Source that explores the technology that helps keep Metro running and passengers and other commuters moving. Some of it applies directly to the trains, buses and freeways and some of it runs in the background — invisible to nearly everyone but essential to mobility in our region.

How do they do that? Make roads smarter

In their future form, smart roads could be the automated highways of tomorrow — the roadways we cruise, possibly in self-driving cars, hooked to a group of other cars headed in the same direction. By traveling together cars can move faster and distances between them can be decreased, since the group accelerates and brakes simultaneously. This maximizes road capacity while it minimizes the chance of accidents, which slow down traffic.

Obviously we’re not there yet. But there are a variety of smart road technologies being used in Los Angeles County and Metro is participating — primarily by helping to fund them — in programs to squeeze more capacity out of streets and freeways. They may not be smart roads of the future, but they are promising advances.

Here’s a quick overview of what’s going on:

•Caltrans and Metro are in talks to mirror a program already running in Orange County on the northbound I-5 freeway. By offering real-time travel comparisons between the freeway and Metrolink, electronic message signs let commuters know when it would be faster to take Metrolink than to stay on the freeway. Comparative travel times would work the same way in L.A. County comparing, say, commute times on the 210 Freeway with the Gold Line speed to Pasadena. The intent is to encourage drivers to consider transit as an option.

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Exhibition on Exposition: New Artwork for the Metro Expo Line

Expo/Crenshaw Station: Willie Robert Middlebrook Jr., Wanderers

Expo/Crenshaw Station: Willie Robert Middlebrook Jr., Wanderers

Exploring Expo? Then welcome to L.A.’s newest art gallery. A permanent exhibition at the new stations of the Expo Line is debuting this weekend.

Here’s the press release, and you can link to The Source reports from here on each installation.

Stations on the Metro Expo Line include 176 new artworks that enrich the transit environment and contribute to the artistic vibrancy of the neighborhoods served by Metro.

Ten artists were commissioned to create original artwork for each of the ten new stations. Art panels featuring designs by the artists are displayed above the entry archways and seating areas.

There are between 8 and 24 individual art panels per station, depending on station configuration. The panels display a body of work by a single artist and add a continuous visual narrative that defines the rail line as it travels through various neighborhoods.

“The station artwork creates stunning new neighborhood landmarks,” said Jorge Pardo, Director of Art & Design for Metro Creative Services. “We’ve presented the artwork like an outdoor gallery display, with art scrolling horizontally along the entire length of the platform to maximize visibility. The art panels are double-sided so whether you’re a Metro customer on a station platform or a pedestrian, cyclist, neighborhood resident, or motorist in proximity to the station, you’ll be able to enjoy the art.”

Durable materials ensure the artwork is resistant to graffiti and color fading, and is easy to maintain. Fabrication materials include glass mosaic, ceramic mosaic, photographic porcelain tile and porcelain enamel steel.

Artworks and artists after the jump:

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