Metro will send a speaker to your class or organization this fall

Members of the Metro Speakers Bureau are available this fall to talk to your group or classroom.

Whether it’s about bike paths or rail lines, clean air or jobs at Metro, the Metro Speakers’ Bureau has it covered.

Where future jobs are concerned, Metro employs a vast array of professions and specialties, including bus and train operators, mechanics and maintenance people, clerks, bus and rail transportation and maintenance supervisors and security guards. Speakers can also address issues such as Measure R, rail construction around Los Angeles, bus lines, urban planning, security aboard buses and rail and even marketing and media relations.

If you have questions or would like to request a speaker for your organization or school, contact us at metrospeaks@metro.net.

New fare charts and FAQ on the fare increases and changes that begin Sept. 15

As many of you likely know, Metro’s fare increases and fare changes that were approved this spring go into effect on September 15.

The charts below outline the new fares, including regular fares and passes, Silver Lane fares and the EZ Pass. I urge everyone to give this a read before Sept. 15 as the new structure — with free transfers for two hours — means that some of you could save on your Metro transit trips while others will be seeing an increase.

I also want to emphasize: please click here to see if you are eligible for Metro’s “Rider Relief” fares that provide up to a $10 discount on transit passes. The Rider Relief coupons for seniors and students provide savings on top of already reduced rates. Eligibility is determined by household income and the number of occupants in a household.

Please, please, please — check to see if you are eligible for a discount. There’s no point in paying more than you should and these discounts are available to enhance everyone’s mobility in our region. If you know of someone who may qualify, please pass along this information!

14-2393_Rider_Relief_Rail_Poster_jp

There is also more information on this page about Metro’s reduced fares, including discounts for students, seniors, the disabled and Medicare recipients.

Here are the new fares that take effect Sept. 15:

fares_English (1)

There is also a comprehensive FAQ that has been posted to metro.net. Please click here to see the entire FAQ.

I have posted some of the questions and answers below that I think will answer many of the questions we’ve been fielding here from readers:

What is the difference between a 1-ride base fare and a 1-way trip?

Both are single fares used to board a Metro Bus. The “1-Ride Base Fare” indicates that the fare is being paid in cash or with a token; no TAP card is required, and no transfers are included. The “1-Way Trip” indicates that the fare is being paid using a TAP card preloaded with a 1-Way Trip product (available at TAP vending machines) or Stored Value on a TAP card. The 1-Way Trip includes transfers to other connecting Metro bus or rail lines for up to two hours to complete a one-way trip; it is not valid for a round-trip. Note that the 1-Ride Base Fare is not available on Metro Rail or the Metro Orange Line; payment of all fares on those lines requires use of a TAP card. (See description of TAP cards below.)

Who is eligible for two hours of free transfers?

Customers are eligible for transfers when enough Stored Value is preloaded on a TAP card and used to pay the applicable 1-Way Trip fare. The 1-Way Trip is available at varying rates to: regular blue TAP card holders; Seniors 62+/Disabled/ Medicare TAP card holders; Students K-12  TAP card holders; and College/Vocational TAP card holders.

How will the free transfers work?

The two-hour period begins upon the first boarding of a trip, when a TAP card is tapped to pay the 1-Way Fare.  The customer must tap their card upon each subsequent boarding during the trip; the TAP system will recognize if the customer is within the two-hour transfer window and is making a valid transfer covered by the 1-Way Trip.

The number of transfers within the two-hour window is not limited; as an example, a customer could transfer from bus line 20 to the Red Line to the Blue Line to the Green Line, all with payment of a 1-Way Trip, as long as the last transfer occurs within two hours of the first tap.

But transfers back to the same bus or rail line where the customer’s TAP card was last used are not permitted. For example,  the customer may not,  transfer from the Green Line back to the Green Line, or from bus line 20 back to Line 20; a new 1-Way Fare would be deducted from the Stored Value on the card.

As mentioned, trips lasting longer than two hours can be made on the 1-Way Trip fare, as long as the last transfer is made before the two-hour transfer window expires.

Are all student fares frozen?

No. Only Student K-12 fares are frozen at this time; their single fare price ($1) and 30-Day Pass ($24) will remain the same. Fares for College/Vocational students are not included in the freeze. The College/Vocational fare (1-Ride Base Fare or 1-Way Trip) is now $1.75, and the 30-Day Pass is now $43.

How will transfers work on Metro short lines?

Customers purchasing a 1-Way Trip receive two hours of transfers to complete a one-way trip. If traveling on a bus short line, transfers will be permitted from the bus short line to another bus on the same line to continue a trip in the same direction.

What about transfers between Metro and other municipal operators (Metro-to-Muni)?

Metro fares do not cover other municipal carriers (e.g. Foothill Transit, Torrance Transit, Montebello Bus Lines, etc.), but Metro-to-Muni transfers will still be available. They can be purchased from TAP vending machines or onboard buses, and are valid for two hours after purchase.

 

How will interagency transfers work with the new transfer system? 

A customer transferring from other municipal bus carriers (e.g. Foothill Transit, Torrance Transit, Montebello Bus Lines, etc.) will need to purchase an Interagency transfer onboard that line, and submit it as payment when boarding a Metro bus or train.  Interagency transfers can be issued as paper passes, “Limited Use” paper TAP cards, or loaded directly onto the customer’s plastic TAP card.  Regardless of the form in which the Interagency transfer is issued, it is only good for one transfer from a municipal bus line to a Metro bus or train. Interagency transfers are treated as a 1-Ride Base Fare and are not eligible for the 2 hours of transfers on Metro.  Customers boarding with an Interagency transfer and planning to ride more than one Metro bus or train should purchase another Metro fare to avoid getting a citation or fine.

Do the new fares affect the Metrolink monthly pass?

No. These changes only apply to Metro. They do not affect Metrolink tickets and passes that include transfers to Metro.

Please click here to see the entire Q&A, which also includes information about the Silver to Silver program, how to get a TAP card and

Here are the new Silver Line fares: 

Metro Fares
As of 9/15/14
Regular Senior 62+/
Disabled/
Medicare
College/
Vocational
Student K-12
Silver Line Cash Fares
1-Ride Base Fare
No transfers included.Additional charges apply to ride:
• Metro Express Buses
$2.50 $1.35
Peak
95¢
Off-Peak
$2.50 $2.50
On TAP
1-Way Trip
Includes transfers to other Metro Lines for up to two hours to complete a one-way trip.Additional charges apply to ride:
• Metro Express Buses
$2.50 $1.35
Peak
95¢
Off-Peak
$2.50 $2.50
Premium Charge for 7-Day, 30-Day and EZ transit passAll other Metro passes accepted without premium charge. 75¢
Express Freeway Premium Charge
Express + Zone 1
Premium Charge

Additional fare required only on freeway segments.
75¢ 60¢ 75¢ 75¢

And here are the new EZ Pass fares:

Metro Fares
As of 9/15/14
Regular Senior 62+/
Disabled/
Medicare
College/
Vocational
Student K-12
EZ transit passIncludes:
•All Metro servicesAdditional charges apply to ride:
• Metro Silver Line
• Metro Express Buses
• Non-Metro express buses
$110 $42
EZ transit pass + Zone 1Includes:
• All Metro servicesAdditional charges apply to ride:
• Non-Metro express buses that leave Los Angeles County
$132 $51.50
EZ transit pass + Zone 2 $154       $61
EZ transit pass + Zone 3 $176 $70.50
EZ transit pass + Zone 4 $198 $80
EZ transit pass + Zone 5 $220 $89.50
EZ transit pass + Zone 6 $242 $99
EZ transit pass + Zone 8 $286 $118
EZ transit pass + Zone 9 $308 $127.50
EZ transit pass + Zone 10 $330 $137
EZ transit pass + Zone 11 $352 $146.50

For more information about ordering an EZ Pass, agencies that participate in the pass and discounts, please click here.

RELATED POSTS

Metro Board votes to raise most fares in September but postpones increases in 2017 and 2020

Some audio and video from public hearing on fare changes

 

Metro Presents: Môfo bringing Brazilian dance music to Union Station

Mark your calendars: Metro Presents Môfo, the only band in Los Angeles that plays in the traditional “pé de serra” style of forró. (Forró–pronounced fo-HAW–is accordion-driven, hip-swiveling dance music originating from the northeast of Brazil.) Check out the video above for a sample of forró sound from a flash mob in Germany.

The band will play in the Fred Harvey Room at Union Station from 8 to 10 p.m. on Friday, August 22. There will be dance instruction offered at 8 and 9 p.m. and Môfo will play two 45-minute sets beginning at 8:15 p.m. and 9:15 p.m. The performance is free and dancing is welcome!

Let us know you’re going to the event by RSVP-ing on Facebook. You can get to Union Station via Metro Bus, Rail and several municipal buses. Find routes and connections with Trip Planner. Directions and parking info are also available at metro.net/unionstation.

Metro Presents: the California Feetwarmers perform at Union Station on August 8

Next up in Metro Presents: The California Feetwarmers bring their unique blend of New Orleans jazz, swing and ragtime to Union Station on Friday, August 8. Make sure to mark your calendars so you don’t miss them!

The Feetwarmers will perform two 45-minute sets in the Union Station waiting room at 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. The performance is free to the public and dancing will be welcome.

Union Station is accessible via Metro Rail, Metro Bus and several municipal bus lines. Use the Trip Planner for routes and connections.

Metro Presents is one year old!

Metro Presents—Metro’s program of free arts and cultural events at the iconic Union Station—turns one year old this month! Everyone is invited to experience this stunningly beautiful LA landmark through art, architecture, music, dance and more.

In the coming days and weeks we’ll bring you some tremendous talent, including contemporary jazz by Mark de Clive-Lowe’s CHURCH TONIGHT (7-9pm, Fred Harvey Room), and swing and ragtime by The California Feetwarmers on Friday 8/8 (4-6pm, Waiting Room). And hey, why not come via train, bus or bike? You can even pick up a commemorative Union Station 75th anniversary TAP card!

From music and dance to film screenings and beyond, Metro Presents programs were conceived as a way to creatively activate the station for existing customers, and also as a way to encourage people to try out transit.

We’re so thankful to all the awesome artists, musicians and organizations we’ve had the pleasure of working with* (scroll down for full list). See photos below for a sampling of events we hosted with them over the past year……..

Our very first event took place in the historic ticketing hall—a screening of the neo-noir “Chinatown,” a partnership with the Downtown Film Festival Los Angeles.  Photo: LA Observed

Our very first event took place in the historic ticketing hall—a screening of the neo-noir “Chinatown,” a partnership with the Downtown Film Festival Los Angeles. Photo: LA Observed

G.G. NineNet filled the grand waiting room space with jazz

G.G. NineNet filled the grand waiting room space with jazz

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Reminder: Metro Presents Mark de Clive-Lowe’s CHURCH at Union Station July 31

Don’t forget, critically acclaimed pianist, composer, producer, DJ and live re-mixer Mark de Clive-Lowe will be celebrating his new album CHURCH with a free performance at the Fred Harvey Room in Union Station this Thursday, July 31. Admission is free and will be on a first come, first served basis. Dancing will be encouraged.

Doors open at 6:45 p.m. There will be a DJ set at 7 p.m. and Mark de Clive-Lowe’s CHURCH begins at 8 p.m.

The event is being presented with Mercado La Paloma.

Metro Presents: contemporary jazz by Mark de Clive-Lowe at Union Station July 31

Don’t miss the next Metro Presents event: jazz and dancing with Mark De Clive-Lowe and his musicians at Los Angeles Union Station on Thursday, July 31. The event will take place from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. inside the Fred Harvey Room and will be free to the public. Make sure to bring your dancing shoes!

The performance is part of Metro Presents, the agency’s ongoing program of arts and cultural events at the iconic station. It is presented in partnership with Mercado La Paloma. Union Station is accessible via Metro Rail, Metro Bus and several municipal bus lines. Use Trip Planner for routes and connections. Car and bicycle parking are also available on site.

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Reflections on Union Station: an essay by D. J. Waldie

waldie_ceiling
On the occasion of Union Station’s 75th anniversary, Metro created a special commemorative publication, Union Station: 75 Years in the Heart of LA, featuring eight written and five photographic essays that celebrate the station by authors John C. Arroyo, William D. Estrada, Stephen Fried, Rafer Guzman, David Kipen, Marisela Norte, D. J. Waldie, and Alissa Walker. The book is on sale now at the online Metro Store. All essays are posted on The Source. The series was edited by Linda Theung, an editor and writer based in Los Angeles.

Union Station: Time and Again
by D. J. Waldie

If it’s possible for a place to have memories of its own, then Union Station in Los Angeles is such a place. It’s also the hub of Metro’s regional transit system and a railroad terminal—people hustle through Union Station for those reasons—but the patient sojourner who sits in one of the throne-like chairs in the waiting room or steps into the adjacent patios inevitably slips out of the everyday and into the station’s own time.

Time was when a giant sycamore shaded native Tongva elders debating village disputes a few hundred feet from where the station’s tracks would be laid. The arrival of Spanish colonists from Sonora and Sinaloa in 1781 swept aside the elders and the village. The sycamore lived on—more than sixty feet high, spreading nearly two hundred feet—until it was felled in 1892.

Later still, the neighborhood that grew up around the sycamore was so culturally diverse that Chinese herbalists dealt from clapboard shops next to tenements occupied by exiled pacifist Russian Molokans and refugees from Mexico’s revolutions. The shops and the tenements were razed by 1936 for the building of Union Station.

Some of the Mexican refugees had already become vendors on Olvera Street. Some of the Chinese moved to New Chinatown not far away. By design, the builders of Union Station reframed the image of Los Angeles for tourists. Some of their first sights would be fantasies of exoticism.

To arrive at the station most travelers would have passed through the San Fernando Valley, quartered into orchards and ranches in the 1940s and subdivided into suburban house lots in the 1950s. As they neared the station, their train would have followed the trace of the Los Angeles River, an open wash in 1939, but by 1945, already a concrete-lined channel in the making.

Arriving passengers in those years would have stepped down from their Pullman car, walked the echoing tunnel beneath the tracks, and entered the station—a space both monumental and deferential, designed to impress and reassure. Outside, Los Angeles sprawled and brawled and offered the traveler the option, if he was willing to pay the price, to endlessly reinvent himself.

Inside, in the minute or two it took to walk beneath the painted ceilings and past the waves of colored tile on the walls, Union Station would have had just enough time to say to the new arrivals, “You’ve come to Los Angeles where brilliant light is dominant, but see how it’s tempered by this space, these fountains, and these flowering trees.” The travelers’ first experience of Los Angeles would have been that transformed brightness.

North Patio

North Patio

South Patio

South Patio

Commuters arriving at Union Station today aboard the Metro Red and Purple Lines or Metrolink and Amtrak trains pass through that same light, unchanged in seventy-five years. Marble blocks in the floor are grooved from the tread of vacationers, aspiring starlets, and the unremarked mass of those embracing or abandoning Los Angeles—and, if you cannot put yourself in their shoes, you can put yourself in the light they encountered. It puts you outside of ordinary time. It’s still the light of nowhere else but Union Station.

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If you worked for the RTD, maybe you’re in one of these photos!

photo 2-1 photo 1-1

One of the more endearing features of my tiny office at Metro is that it’s often treated as (or mistaken for) a closet. Thus I was hardly surprised yesterday to find that the two above photos had magically been deposited in my space although I don’t recall asking for old photos of what appears to be the RTD softball team.

The RTD and the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission merged to form the MTA (aka Metro) in 1993. Based on clothing, facial hair, regular hair the wearing of sunglasses indoors and transit agency history, I’m guessing the photos are from the summer of 1990.

UPDATE: Three colleagues surmise these photos are probably from the mid-1980s, having noticed fresh hats from the ’84 Summer Olympics. Also, they may have been taken to promote RTD clothing items sold at the time.

SECOND UPDATE: One of the people in the photos works at Metro! She writes:Yes, we were modeling not playing baseball on the company team.  Back in the day, RTD had an employee store and they had just gotten in some company wear with the logo and they called for some employees to come and sport the wear/gear for advertising purpose.  Those were the good ole days!”

And why am I posting them? Well, I have other decor in mind for my work crib and I’ve love to unload these on someone who would actually value them. If you recognize yourself — or your former hairdo — drop me a line at hymons@metro.net.

P.S. sorry about the glare on the photos. I didn’t have time to take good photos of the photos.

P.P.S. Yes, there was once upon a time two giant agencies overseeing transit in Los Angeles County. If you’re thinking “that sounds like a good recipe for creating a big bureaucratic mess,” I’m thinking the same thing.