Transit riders survey: Tell us what you think

Passenger Survey - Tell Us What You Think

Metro recently launched an online survey to gather input from bus and train riders about Metro service. The survey aims to gather information on how riders are currently using the system and where and how Metro can better meet their needs.

Metro operates the country’s second largest bus system and a growing rail network. The survey is a chance to help the agency with the continuous improvement of its operations and to respond to customer concerns and recommendations. Need another reason to take the survey? One winner will be selected from each drawing period to receive a check in the amount of $250. The survey runs through March 31st.

Share your thoughts and help Metro improve its service by taking the online survey today.

 

 

2011 survey results of Metro riders; majority say they are satisfied with service

Each spring Metro conducts a survey of its bus and rail passengers to generate feedback about the agency. The 2011 survey was conducted last spring and summer with nearly 15,000 respondents. The results are posted below from both bus and train riders, along with the combined results.

As you can see, the results are not dramatically different than from 2010 — and the vast majority of passengers say they are satisfied with Metro’s service. The results also show another uptick in the number of Metro riders with cell phones — now 75 percent, with 64 percent of those smart phones — and a four percent increase in the number of passengers using TAP cards.

When reading the results, the first number is for “strongly agree,” the second number for “agree,” the third number for “disagree” and the fourth number for “strongly disagree.” As usual, Metro followed industry-standard survey practices.

What do you think of the results? Do they mirror your experiences on Metro? What do you think they say about the Metro system? Leave a comment please.

System Results S11

The individual survey results for bus and rail riders are posted after the jump.

Continue reading

Missed the Green Line to LAX workshops? You can still share your thoughts by taking this survey

Green Line to LAX Community Workshops solicited comments from attendees.

Green Line to LAX Community Workshops solicited comments from attendees.

Yesterday was the last of the first round of community workshops for the the Green Line to LAX extension. According to the project team over 200 people attended the three workshops to learn more about the project and offer their input on how best to connect the Green Line to the airport.

If you weren’t able to attend the meetings, fear not, you can still share your feedback with the project team.

First, I recommend getting some background information on the project. This can be found on the project page on Metro.net, the project’s Facebook page or right here on The Source.

Once you’ve done that there are a number of methods to share your input. First is the LAX User Questionnaire, a 16-question survey about how you currently get to LAX and how you’d prefer to get to LAX. Another option is to use this online comment/feedback form to email the project team specific comments.

Comments are requested by October 1, 2011.

Metro ridership shows slight uptick in May

Before I get to the latest ridership numbers, I wanted to include my daily nag to take our latest survey above — if you haven’t already. I suspect results from this poll, which I’ll discuss at a later date, may have something to do with the ridership numbers below.

As for the latest Metro ridership numbers from this past May, there was a slight increase over May 2010 (39,423,063 compared to 39,258,435). Most of the gains were on the bus side of Metro operations, but Metro Rail saw an increase, too.

Overall, Metro and many other agencies are still trying to reach ridership highs of 2008. On a national level, ridership was slightly up in the first quarter of 2011, according to stats compiled [pdf] by the American Public Transportation Assn.

The prevailing view among many agencies across the country is that the recession, unemployment, fluctuating gas prices, dips in funding for transit and accompanying service cuts have all impacted ridership in the past three years.

Continue reading

Why I Cycle: The bike-to-transit experience

In celebration of National Bike Month and Bike Week L.A. (this week!) we’ve launched a new survey series entitled ‘Why I Cycle.’ This series spotlights local bicyclists who have made the daring leap from car-dependent to car-free or at least car-light in Los Angeles.

Want to share your story? Point your browser to thesource.metro.net/cyclesurvey

Why I Cycle: Connecting Transit Modes

Of particular interest to Metro is bike-to-transit behavior. The results: 49% of Why I Cycle survey respondents said they bike to fill a commuting gap – the fabled “last mile” dilemma.

We asked “If you ride your bike to transit, what lines do you take?”

Many people use a mix of transit but Metro Rail received the most votes, followed by Metro Rapid and Local buses.

Why I Cycle: Rail Station AccessWe asked Metro Rail riders how they access stations with their bikes. Results: 32% said they use the stairs, 18% use the escalators and 16% use the elevators. The remaining 16% said they don’t take their bikes on the train.

The large percentage of cyclists who access Metro rail stations using the stairs will be happy to hear that thanks to feedback at Metro’s Bicycle Roundtable, special stair channels for bicycles will be considered in the design of new Metro stations. The under construction El Monte Transit Station will be the first station to implement stair channels.

We also asked for specific ideas on how to improve bike-to-transit connections. Many said they’d like to see rail cars added that are solely dedicated for bicycles. Others complained that turnstiles made it difficult to enter stations and that wider gates should be installed. Bus racks capable of holding three bikes was another common suggestion.

After the jump, more thoughts from survey respondents on how to improve the bike-to-transit experience. Continue reading

Why I Cycle: Joseph, Long Beach

In celebration of National Bike Month and in anticipation of Bike Week L.A. (May 16-20) we’ve launched a new survey series entitled ‘Why I Cycle’. This series spotlights local bicyclists who have made the daring leap from car-dependent to car-free or at least car-light in Los Angeles.

Want to share your story? Point your browser to thesource.metro.net/cyclesurvey

Name: Joseph
Location: Long Beach

What’s the No. 1 reason you bicycle?

It’s fastest, cheapest and most fun way to get exercise. Going to the gym would waste more time (I have to get places anyone), it is boring, and expensive. My bike is cheaper than driving, heck it’s cheaper than an Easy Pass or LB Transit pass, and it is faster than driving to work and then driving to the gym 3 times a week.

What bike paths, routes or lanes do you take?

I don’t have any on my current route to work. :-(
But I do take bike lanes to church, to the beach or Belmont Shore, and to restaurants in Downtown Long Beach.

If you could make one change to improve your biking experience in Los Angeles County, what would it be?

Bike lanes or cycletracks on all major streets, especial the streets that intersect with every rail and rapid transit line. May more people would bike for transportation if they felt safe and if it was a pleasant experience, not dodging traffic or dealing with winding side streets.

What specific improvements would you recommend to improve bike-to-transit trips?

Increase bike parking at all rapid transit stations, and add bike racks at EVERY bus stop. Make sure there are safe ways (protected or buffered bike lanes, cycletracks, or bike boulevards) to get to every bus stop or transit station. And make it possible to rent bikes at major stations, so people can leave a bike at one station and then pick up another when they get to their destination, without having to cram the bike onto the train. Washington DC’s bike sharing system is a great example.

How would you encourage others to bicycle?

Los Angeles is beautiful and it has the best weather and some of the best terrain for bike riding in the whole world. Why stay stuck in traffic, in your car, when you can get exercise, save money, have fun, and even save time by riding a bike and taking transit?

Briefly, how would you describe your typical biking experience?

I love it!

Why I Cycle: Describe your typical biking experience?

In celebration of National Bike Month and in anticipation of Bike Week L.A. (May 16-20) we’ve launched a new survey series entitled ‘Why I Cycle’. This series spotlights local bicyclists who have made the daring leap from car-dependent to car-free or at least car-light in Los Angeles.

Want to share your story? Point your browser to thesource.metro.net/cyclesurvey

Why I Cycle: Describe your typical biking experience

The people have spoken and they love biking.

When asked, “How would you describe your typical biking experience?,” 69% of Why I Cycle survey respondents said “I love it!

Twenty five percent said “I deal with it.” and only 2% said “I hate it. There has to be a better way.

It’s interesting to compare these results to the answers to a similar question on our Why You Ride (or Don’t) surveys. In response to the question, “How would you describe your typical transit experience?, 48% responded with “I love it!,”  42% said “I deal with it,” and 11% said “I hate it.” On the driving side, only 15% said they “love” their car commute, while 56% said “I deal with it.” And 26% said “I hate it.

One reason for this outpouring of cycle love could come down to simple economics. To wit:

Why I Cycle: how much do yu spend each month traveling by bicycle

Seventy eight percent of respondents say they spend less than $25. Meanwhile, 7% say they spend $25-$50, 10% spend $50-$100 and 0% report spending more than $100 per month on bike travel.

Compare that to our Why You Ride (or Don’t) results in which most transit users said they spend $50 to $100 each month and most drivers report spending between $100 and $300 on monthly transportation costs.