A Better Blue Line: 30-day closure of four DTLB Blue Line Stations start tomorrow

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Blue Line shuttle buses headsigns.

Blue Line shuttle buses headsigns.

This is it, folks: the 30-day closure of four downtown Long Beach Blue Line stations starts Saturday, September 20. During the closure, bus shuttles will replace train service at Downtown Long Beach Station, Pacific Street Station, 1st Street Station and 5th Street Station.

Anaheim to DTLB Closure

Click to see larger size.

Customers will be able to ride the bus shuttles from Anaheim Street Station to the four stations listed above at no charge. Shuttles will run at the same Blue Line service levels and will be scheduled to meet trains for transfers. At Anaheim Street Station, regular train service will continue northward to Los Angeles.

Buses in Long Beach will be detouring off 1st Street to Ocean Avenue during the closure. First Street will be closed from Long Beach Boulevard to Pacific Avenue during construction. Pedestrian and bicycle access on 1st Street will remain open.

The press release from Metro is after the jump.

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Upcoming Service Advisory: Expo Line to run every 20-30 minutes this weekend for station work

Update: The work planned for this Saturday, September 20 will also take place this Sunday, September 21. As on Saturday, Expo Line trains will run every 20-30 minutes until close of service, with trains sharing the Downtown Los Angeles-bound track at Jefferson/USC, Expo Park/USC, and Expo/Vermont Stations. Specific departure times for this Sunday from 7th Street/Metro Center and Culver City stations can be found on our Service Advisories page.

It’s rare to find a weekend in the fall when the Expo Line is not flooded with football fans on their way to the Coliseum. That’s why, with no game this Saturday, Metro will perform needed work on the platform canopies at Expo Park/USC Station.

Trains on the Expo Line will run every 20 to 30 minutes from open to close of service, sharing the Downtown-Los Angeles bound track between Jefferson/USC and Expo/Vermont Stations. For specific departures times from 7th Street/Metro Center and Culver City Station, please see our Service Advisories page.

NexTrip will be updated with accurate departure times for all other Expo Line stations. For up-to-the minute service alerts, follow us on Twitter @metrolosangeles and @metroLAalerts.

Full closure of parts of Crenshaw Boulevard this weekend for Crenshaw/LAX Line construction

Three releases from Metro:

Crenshaw Boulevard to Close Two Weekends to Complete Walls for Underground Crenshaw/Expo Station

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Metro and Walsh/Shea Corridor Contractors will close Crenshaw Boulevard between Exposition Boulevard and Coliseum Street two weekends on Sept. 19 and Oct. 24 to complete pile installation and begin excavation of the underground Crenshaw/Expo station.

The work has been schedule for two weekends, Friday, Sept. 19 to 6 a.m. Monday, Sept, 22 and 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 24 to 6 a.m. Monday, Oct. 27.

The installation of pile and building of the walls is necessary for the construction of the light rail line Crenshaw/LAX and its underground stations. Simultaneous wall installation and soldier pile will continue to occur behind K-rail on the west side of the street.

Detours during the three weekend closures will be as follows:

Southbound:

If traveling south on Crenshaw Boulevard, turn left at Jefferson Boulevard, right at Arlington Avenue, right at Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and left at Crenshaw Boulevard.

Northbound:

If traveling north on Crenshaw Boulevard, turn right at Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, left at Arlington Avenue, left at Jefferson Boulevard and right at Crenshaw Boulevard.

Eastbound and westbound traffic on Rodeo Road will be maintained as well as access to businesses and pedestrian access.

For information on bus stops changes, please visit metro.net/service/advisories/

Construction of Underground Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard Station Moves from east to west side of Crenshaw Boulevard

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Pile installation operation for the Crenshaw/LAX Transit Project underground Martin Luther King station will move on Sept. 20, from the east to the west side of Crenshaw Boulevard between Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and Stocker Street.

A 16-hour full street closure will be needed to implement a new traffic reconfiguration it will begin at 9 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 20, and concluded by 1 p.m. Sunday, Sept 21.

The detours will be done in two phases: from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. between Jefferson Boulevard and Vernon Avenue and from 2 a.m. to 1 p.m. between Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and Stocker Street.

Detour from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. from Jefferson Boulevard to Vernon Avenue

Southbound:

If traveling south on Crenshaw Boulevard, turn left at Jefferson Boulevard, right at Arlington Avenue, right at Vernon Avenue and left on Crenshaw.

Northbound:

If traveling north on Crenshaw Boulevard, turn right at Vernon Avenue, left at Arlington Avenue, left at Rodeo Road and right at Crenshaw Boulevard.

Detour from 2 a.m. to 1 p.m. from Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard to Stocker Street

Southbound:

When traveling south on Crenshaw Boulevard turn left at Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, right at Arlington Avenue, right at Vernon Avenue, and left at Crenshaw Boulevard.

Northbound:

If traveling north on Crenshaw Boulevard turn right at Vernon Avenue, left at Arlington Avenue, left at Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and right at Crenshaw Boulevard.

The traffic reconfiguration will allow street restriping, relocate existing K-rail (concrete barriers) and place heavy equipment to continue building the walls for the underground station.

After the Sept 20-21 weekend Crenshaw Boulevard will have two traffic lanes in each direction. Once the street reopens Sunday afternoon, the left turn pockets on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and Stocker Street will be restored. The same reconfiguration will last for approximately next three years until the underground station is completed.

There will be limited access to businesses during the night-time activity, although pedestrian access will be maintained. Also, after the closure, bus stops on the west side of Crenshaw and on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard will be relocated to the northwest corner of Crenshaw Boulevard and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, and to the southwest corner of Crenshaw Boulevard and Stocker Street.

For information on bus stops changes, please visit metro.net/service/advisories/

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Your Friday send-off: Sia – Elastic Heart

Here’s to a cooler weekend, dear transit blog readers. This Friday’s choice comes courtesy of my impatience for the next installment of the Hunger Games movies. (Although I still don’t think Mockingjay should be two movies. But that’s why I’m not in the movie biz.)

If enjoying music on bus or train, please remember to use your headphones. And if you have transit playlist song recs, leave them in the comments or tweet them at us @metrolosangeles! Awesome tracks (as deemed by yours truly) will be shared in future posts.

Here’s the map and highlights for new 788 Valley-Westside Express Bus

Line 788 Key Points

Line 788 Key Points2

 

As was reported yesterday on Board Member Zev Yaroslavsky’s website, the new 788 Valley-Westside Express Bus will begin service on Dec. 15. The bus will use the HOV lanes on the 405 over the Sepulveda Pass (as you likely know, the northbound HOV lane was recently built and opened this year as part of the I-405 Sepulveda Pass Improvements Project).

The above PowerPoint slides show some highlights of the service and the route. For those wondering about the dip down to Oxnard Street in the San Fernando Valley, the reason is that it allows the new 788 to stop at two key Orange Line stations — Van Nuys and Sepulveda. It also makes it easier for the 788 to get on the 405 freeway and make its way over to the HOV lanes.

Transportation headlines, Friday, September 19

Have a transportation-related article you think should be included in headlines? Drop me an email! And don’t forget, Metro is on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

ART OF TRANSIT: Four swans visiting Union Station last week. Check out Metro's promotion with the Music Center for tickets to "Swan Lake" by clicking on the photo.

ART OF TRANSIT: Four swans visiting Union Station last week. Check out Metro’s promotion with the Music Center for tickets to “Swan Lake” by clicking on the photo. Photo by Steve Hymon/Metro.

Metro removes “Red Band Society” ad over offensive language (The Wrap)

Metro staff announced they were pulling the ad on Wednesday after receiving numerous complaints about the way that Octavia Spencer’s character was described in the ad.

Metro officials said that the contractor who sells ad space on buses didn’t properly vet the ad with Metro before it went up. Metro Board Chair Eric Garcetti apologized for the ad at a Board committee meeting yesterday and Board Members said there’s a need to better oversee which ads end up on Metro buses. Also, coverage in the L.A. Times.

Who’s on board? (TransitCenter)

Perhaps the most interesting finding of this new survey is:

Americans under 30 are 2.3 times more likely to ride public transit than Americans age 30-60, and 7.2 times more likely than Americans over 60. Even after controlling for other factors, older people are less likely to ride transit than younger people.

That certainly jibes with trends in recent years that have received a lot of media attention — with millennials less interested in driving than their parents and more interested in living in cities. The question: what will transit agencies do about it? The findings certainly suggest, at the least, that transit agencies need to have their act together on social media and that other little thing — offer service that complements the lifestyle of those 30 and under.

How’s Metro doing on that front, people? Comment please.

At continent’s edge, an epic rail ride concludes (Grist)

The concluding post by Heather Smith on her recent cross-country ride on Amtrak. These two graphs are great and relate to the previous item in today’s headlines:

Stories like this, about rehabilitated towns, fascinate me: I spent my teens and early twenties feeling like a member of a subculture of a subculture of subculture, all because I loved walkable cities and hated driving. Where was the place for surly punks who wore all black and read Jane Jacobs? Where was the place, come to think of it, for anyone who read Jane Jacobs?

It’s a surreal feeling to realize how my teenage ideas aren’t that out-there any more, and that a lot of cities in America are places where I’d be happy living. I know from experience that this could all disappear, like the road bike fad of the ’70s, but I hope that it lasts.

Why do planners love charging for parking and not congestion? (Urban theory and practice)

Lisa Schweitzer of USC asks a provocative question and offers an answer: charging for parking is relatively easy and contributes to depleted municipal coffers whereas congestion pricing is a much more difficult sell politically. The discussion continues in the comments.

The post reminded me of something UCLA Brian Taylor said during the Zocalo Public Square forum earlier this year on the SR-710 Study and a possible freeway tunnel for the 710 between Alhambra and Pasadena. Brian’s point: congestion in our region could be fixed today if there was congestion pricing that tolled the freeways to discourage everyone from trying to drive somewhere during peak hours. He’s probably right, as is Lisa: that’s like ask our local pols to climb Mt. Everest without supplemental oxygen or Sherpas.

Fun video posted last month: