Take Metro Gold Line + the Parsons’ shuttle to see Jay-Z and Bey at the Rose Bowl this weekend

Featured

10458802_10154451524440601_3591343110483891320_n

Jay-Z and Beyonce are performing at the Rose Bowl Stadium in Pasadena this Saturday and Sunday, August 2 and 3, as part of their “On the Run” tour. And to those of you lucky enough to have tickets to the sold-out show, this is just a friendly reminder that you can go Metro to the concert!

To get to the show, take the Metro Gold Line to Memorial Park Station in Old Pasadena and complete your trip with a shuttle ride to the stadium.

Shuttles to the Rose Bowl will depart approximately every 5 minutes from the Parson’s parking lot at the corner of Union/De Lacey Street, four blocks southwest of the station. Shuttles will run from 2 p.m. through show time. Return trips from the stadium to Old Pasadena will run until 90 minutes after the concert ends. The cost of a round-trip shuttle ride is $10 per person.

A final FYI for Gold Line customers attending “On the Run” or HARD Summer this weekend: load your return fare in advance. Purchasing a $5 Day Pass (good through 3 a.m.) or loading an extra $1.50 on your TAP card at your departure station will save you from long lines at the TAP vending machines on your way home.

Metro hopes all concert-goers have a great time this weekend. We’ll see you on the Metro Gold Line, thanks for riding!

Free shuttle to HARD Summer for Metro riders

Featured

artworkHARD Summer is back August 2 and 3 from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. both days. The two-day festival is taking place at the Whittier Narrows Recreation Area in South El Monte and boasts more than fifty live performances and world class DJ sets including Jack U, A$AP Mob, Axwell, and Flosstraddamus performing on five stages. And taking Metro is still the best way to get to HARD Summer! HARD Summer is providing free shuttles to connect Metro riders to the concert.

To get there: hop on the Metro Gold Line to Atlantic Station in East LA and get a free shuttle ride to the concert. Shuttles will be located directly across the street from Atlantic Station, at the intersection of Pomona and Beverly Boulevards. Shuttles to HARD Summer will be running from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.

After the concert: follow the festival exit signs to Rosemead Boulevard. The free shuttles will be located just south of the main entrance and will return you to Atlantic Station. Return shuttles will be running from 8 p.m. through 12 a.m. The last shuttle back to Atlantic Station leaves at midnight, so it’s best that you get in line immediately after the concert ends so you don’t miss the last train from Atlantic Station or any connections thereafter. Metro operates late-night rail service until 2 a.m. on Saturdays and will also run late-night rail service on Sunday for HARD Summer.

Tips for riding:

  • The Gold Line ride between Union Station and Atlantic Station takes less than 30 minutes.
  • Use Trip Planner for more routes and connections.
  • Regular Metro Rail fares apply: $1.50 per line / $5 Day Pass (good till 3 a.m.).
  • Each person must have his/her own TAP card. (No sharing of TAP cards)
  • Avoid long return lines at TAP Vending Machines by loading your round trip fare in advance online or on your way in.

Open During Construction: Malai Hair Store on Crenshaw Boulevard

View of construction along Crenshaw Boulevard just north of Stocker Street. There is pedestrian access to businesses.

View of construction along Crenshaw Boulevard just north of Stocker Street. The sidewalk is open for pedestrian access to businesses.

Construction continues along Crenshaw Boulevard for the Crenshaw/LAX Line, which means fencing and blocked lanes in order for work to proceed on the underground portion of the rail line. The above photo shows the east side of Crenshaw north of Stocker Street, and it obviously looks pretty uninviting. However, the businesses located there are absolutely open during construction.

Photo: Google Maps

Parking is available on the west side of Crenshaw Blvd at Baldwin Hills Crenshaw, or along Stocker Street. Photo: Google Maps

To access this location, you can park at Baldwin Hills Crenshaw. Limited street parking is also available along Stocker Street. Or take transit: Metro Bus 40, 210 and Rapid 710 travel through the area and the stop at the corner of Crenshaw/Stocker.

Some of the businesses in the area have been around for quite some time and provide important services for those in the neighborhood — and many of the merchants live in the community. Over the next few months, we’ll be featuring some of the Crenshaw businesses on The Source to remind everyone that they are open and worth checking out. And with that, let’s hear from the co-owner of Malai Hair Store:

Metrolink to offer special “Rail Series” service as Angels take on the Dodgers   

Watch the Dodgers take on the Angels August 4 and 5 at Dodger Stadium. Metrolink is offering special $7 round-trip tickets on the Orange County Line on game days. From Union Station, you can hop on the Dodger Stadium Express to get to the game.

Here’s the press release from Metrolink:

LOS ANGELES - Metrolink has partnered with Metro to provide special train service to the Los Angeles Dodgers versus Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim interleague play on August 4 and 5 at Dodger Stadium. This is the second year the special “Rail Series” train service will be offered through a special grant from the Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Review Committee (MSRC).

This service was offered earlier this season as well, when the two teams squared off on March 27 and 28.

Special $7 round-trip tickets can be purchased the day of game at the ticket machines along the Orange County Line. Fans attending one of the Rail Series games will board Metrolink Orange County Line train 609 or 689 to Los Angeles Union Station.

From Union Station, fans will board the Dodger Stadium Express shuttle to Dodger Stadium at no additional cost. Following the game, fans will ride the Dodger Stadium Express back to Union Station to board the special Metrolink train making all station stops, except Commerce, back to Oceanside. The Rail Series special train will depart L.A. Union Station one hour after the end of the game.

This is the fifth consecutive year Metro is offering the Dodger Stadium Express bus service from Union Station to Dodger Stadium. The Dodger Stadium Express picks up Dodger fans at the Patsaouras Bus Plaza adjacent to the east portal of Union Station and continues to Dodger Stadium via Sunset Boulevard and Cesar Chavez Avenue.

A two-year grant of more than $1.1 million ($1,169,000) was awarded to Metro by the MSRC last year to fund the operation of the Dodger Stadium Express service for both the 2013 and 2014 Dodgers baseball seasons. The funding is made in support of clean fuel transit service to link Union Station to Dodger Stadium. The MSRC awards funding within the South Coast Air Basin from a portion of the vehicle registration fee set aside for mobile source projects that result in emission reductions.

Funding under the MSRC grant will be used to offset the cost of fares on the Dodger Stadium Express bus service for passengers possessing a Dodger ticket. Service will be provided starting 90 minutes prior to the beginning of the games and will end 45 minutes after the end of the game.

For additional details on the service and train schedules, please visitwww.metrolinktrains.com.

ABOUT METROLINK (www.metrolinktrains.com)

Metrolink is Southern California’s regional commuter rail service in its 21styear of operation. The Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA), a joint powers authority made up of an 11-member board representing the transportation commissions of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Ventura counties, governs the service. Metrolink operates over seven routes through a six-county, 512 route-mile network. Metrolink is the third largest commuter rail agency in the United States based on directional route miles and the eighth largest based on annual ridership.

Congress relents and funds Highway Trust Fund through next May

Here’s the update from Metro’s government relations staff:

Highway Trust Fund and Transportation Program Extension Bill is Sent to the President’s Desk

Last night, before the U.S. Senate departed Washington for a five week recess, Senators voted (81-13) to send the House’s bill to fund the Highway Trust Fund and extend authorization and appropriations for highway and transit programs to the President Obama’s desk for his signature. H.R. 5021 extends funding and programs until May 31, 2015. The Senate’s action comes after an attempt earlier this week to amend the House bill. Changes made by the Senate were rejected by the House yesterday and the bill was sent back to the Senate for reconsideration. As a previous White House Statement of Administration Policy expresses, the President supports H.R. 5021 and is expected to sign the legislation later this afternoon.

 

Transit agencies such as Metro rely on the Highway Trust Fund to provide money for maintenance and capital projects, among other important items. The House and the Senate have been bickering in recent days over how best to continue funding for the Highway Trust Fund without raising the federal gas tax, which was last increased in 1993.

In other words, this is a short-term fix. Here’s a Washington Post editorial published yesterday about the issue of the gas tax.

And how is Congress paying to keep the Trust Fund going? As CBS explains, through pension smoothing, a variety of U.S. Customs user fees and transferring money from a fund devoted to fixing leaking underground storage tanks.

 

Transportation headlines, Friday, August 1

Have a transportation-related article you think should be included in headlines? Drop me an email! And don’t forget, Metro is on TwitterFacebook and Instagram. Pick your social media poison! 

ART OF TRANSIT: Nice pic taken last month on the Blue Line. Photo courtesy Matthew Grant Anson, via Flickr.

ART OF TRANSIT: Nice pic taken last month on the Blue Line. Photo courtesy Matthew Grant Anson, via Flickr.

The value of fast transit (Transport Politic)

As our very own Joe Lemon recently noted after a visit to the Twin Cities, the new light rail line connecting Minneapolis and St. Paul is a crawler, taking 48 minutes to an hour to travel 11 miles. Yonah Freemark, in this new post, writes:

Of course, the Twin Cities are hardly alone in their predicament. Recent transit lines elsewhere in the country feature similarly leisurely travel times. The new Houston North Line, for example, is averaging 17 mph. Los Angeles’ Expo Line is slightly quicker at 18 mph. Bus rapid transit and streetcar projects popping up virtually everywhere are often significantly slower. Only the Washington, D.C. Metro Silver Line, which will extend that region’s subway deep into the Virginia suburbs, will speed commuters along at an average of 32 mph. It will do so while only stopping at 5 stations, all of which will be located in the middle of expressways.

With speeds like those light rail lines or services like the Silver Line, it’s little wonder that it’s so difficult to convince people to get out of their cars in so many places. The fact of the matter is that services like this often do not provide much mobility improvement over the bus services they replace. That’s particularly true for large regions where too many destinations are simply too far away to be accessible by transit that averages such slow speeds.

The post goes on to note, very correctly, that the problem is that fast transit usually means putting transit on bridges or underground and that makes it prohibitively expensive at a time when there is only so much help the federal government in the U.S. will provide. As a result, less expensive and slower versions of transit get built.

Meet the worst transit project in America (Vox)

Writer Matthew Yglesias wags his finger at a streetcar line in Washington D.C. that’s under construction. Not only will it share a traffic lane with cars, the streetcar will likely block faster buses. This kind of slow transit project, Yglesias writes, not only harms the low-income riders who most rely on public transit (i.e. they’re stuck on transit instead of doing something else useful), but also creates a backlash against expensive transit projects that turn out to be of little use to motorists seeking an alternative to driving. Concur.

The missing link: exploring the Regional Connector transit corridor (KCET)

Nice summary of the neighborhoods and sights along the future Connector’s 1.9-mile route through downtown Los Angeles between Little Tokyo and the 7th/Metro Center Station. The Connector, as the name implies, will connect the Gold Line to the Blue Line and Expo Line. That will allow trains to run straight through downtown and should allow for faster rides and fewer transfers for most riders.

L.A. is working on a major zoning code revamp (L.A. Times) 

Good primer on efforts to revise the citywide code and, more importantly, the community plans that really dictate how neighborhoods look and what kind of development is allowed. This has been in the works for quite some time and looks like there are several years to go. At the end of the day, these plans will decide what gets built near transit.

Does Eric Garcetti have a big enough vision for L.A.? (Governing)

Very interesting profile on the mayor of Los Angeles, who is also the Chair of the Metro Board of Directors for the next 11 months. Garcetti makes a persuasive case that a back to basics approach is the best way to persuade people to believe in government again. Not much on transportation until the final graph. Excerpt:

Eric Garcetti wants to win big — he just believes that the way to do it is to bring the city’s fundamental management processes under control as a first step. Not until 2016 do most observers expect to see Garcetti himself put a controversial proposal before voters: That’s when he is expected to back an updated version of Measure R, the 2008 sales tax initiative that jump-started construction of the so-called Purple and Crenshaw subway lines.

 

The Metro Board has been discussing the possibility of a ballot measure in 2016 and the agency has asked local cities for their input. Nothing has been decided yet, including whether Metro would ask voters to extend Measure R or seek a new sales tax increase in order to accelerate projects and fund new ones. This is obviously one of the big storylines this blog will be following for the next two years.

Go Metro Weekends, Aug 1-3

Shhh...don't wake the subway cars! Jon Ross Alexander/Metro

Shhh…don’t wake the subway cars! Jon Ross Alexander/Metro

Friday

Head out to the Parish Room of the House of Blues for the First Friday comedy show. This month, the series celebrates its first anniversary. As always, the show is free to attend though tickets are required to get in. There’s also a dress code: no shorts. Seating starts at 7 p.m. (Metro Bus 2 to Sunset/Kings)

Saturday

Street Food Cinema continues this weekend at Exposition Park. Check out Dazed and Confused while enjoying dishes from some of L.A.’s hottest food trucks! Doors open at 5:30 p.m., the band Speardane goes on at 6:30 p.m. and the movie starts at 8:30 p.m. General admission is $12. (Metro Expo Line to Expo Park/USC Station)

Sunday

Free Shakespeare Festival at Griffith Park: To attend or not to attend? That is the question, and the answer is yes. This Sunday, check out the revision on the classic comedy Twelfth Night. Festivities begin at 7 p.m. (Metro Red Line to Vermont/Sunset Station, then hop on the DASH Observatory Shuttle to Griffith Park)

ShopWalk DTLA makes its return this Sunday! Taking over the Downtown Historic Core, bask in the summer weather and enjoy a day of shopping, good food and lots of fun. Show your TAP card for some free swag and discounts at participating businesses! (Metro Red/Purple Line to Pershing Square Station or Blue/Expo Line to 7th/Metro Center Station)

All Weekend

Just a quick reminder: Free Shuttles to and from HARD Summer will be in service from the Gold Line Atlantic Station. Metro Rail will also run late-night service on Sunday. (Metro Gold Line to Atlantic Station)

The 21st annual Long Beach Crawfish Festival is taking place at Rainbow Lagoon Park in Downtown Long Beach this Saturday and Sunday from noon to 11 p.m. and noon to 10 p.m., respectively. Come get your fill of crawfish, live sports and plenty of entertainment! One-day admission is $13 if you purchase in advance online or $15 at the door. (Metro Blue Line to Downtown Long Beach Station, then walk south on Pine Avenue or hop on the free Passport Shuttle)

Metro Presents: the California Feetwarmers perform at Union Station on August 8

Next up in Metro Presents: The California Feetwarmers bring their unique blend of New Orleans jazz, swing and ragtime to Union Station on Friday, August 8. Make sure to mark your calendars so you don’t miss them!

The Feetwarmers will perform two 45-minute sets in the Union Station waiting room at 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. The performance is free to the public and dancing will be welcome.

Union Station is accessible via Metro Rail, Metro Bus and several municipal bus lines. Use the Trip Planner for routes and connections.