L.A. Metro shares keys to success of Measure M vote

(pdf here)

Metro today released a new report titled “How to Pass a Mega Transportation Measure” to provide lessons learned to transportation agencies and other stakeholders considering pursuit of a ballot measure to increase local transportation funding. 

In Nov. 2016, Metro’s Measure M was approved by 71.15 percent of Los Angeles County voters, far exceeding the two-thirds approval needed. Measure M included a new half-cent sales tax and eliminated a sunset provision for the Measure R sales tax approved in 2008, creating a perpetual source of funding for mobility improvements across Los Angeles County.

Under Measure M, 40 major road, transit and walking/biking projects are slated to be built in the next 40 years. Work is underway to accelerate many of those projects, so they are completed by the 2028 Summer Olympics and Paralympics to be held in the L.A. region.

Measure M also includes funds that are returned directly to local cities for their own transportation projects and annual funding for State of Good Repair projects to ensure infrastructure is maintained.

The new lessons learned report documents the three-year process of developing and building support for Measure M. It attributes the success of Measure M to many efforts, but emphasizes some major factors:

• Creating a bottom up process that engaged all cities in L.A. County.

• Conducting frequent surveying of the public to determine their needs and shape messaging.

• Using performance-based metrics to prioritize projects.

• Implementing a robust education program with powerful stories about the need to improve transportation.

The report was researched and written by Joel Epstein, a local writer and consultant. He interviewed more than 70 Metro employees, Board Members, stakeholders and advocates as part of the research for the report.

5 replies

  1. It only proves what Barnum, Trump and Menchen have known for years that overall, no one ever lost a buck underestimating the intelligence of the voting public.

  2. When the voting public votes to give up a time limit on their Metro taxes, you know that “they have met the enemy and it is them.”