71-day closure of five Green Line stations begins Jan. 26 to connect Crenshaw/LAX Line to Green Line

A view taken earlier this year of the guideway connecting the Crenshaw/LAX Line tracks to the junction of the Green Line. Photo: Metro.

Metro will begin work on connecting the junction of the Crenshaw/LAX Line and Green Line starting Friday, Jan. 26, Metro CEO Phil Washington said Thursday. The work will require a 71-day closure of five Green Line stations: Redondo Beach, Douglas, El Segundo, Mariposa and Aviation/LAX Station.

Service will be maintained through free bus shuttles in place of Green Line service between Hawthorne/Lennox and Redondo Beach Station during the closure. Bus shuttles will stop at all stations and run as frequently as the Green Line. For those planning to travel to LAX Airport during this period, the LAX Shuttle G bus will temporarily be relocated to operate from Hawthorne/Lennox Station.

In addition to work on the rail junction between the Crenshaw/LAX Line and the Green Line, Metro is using the closure to make track and signal upgrades to the Green Line as part of the agency’s State of Good Repair program.

We’ll have much more info and a robust notification process as details are finalized and we get closer to Jan. 26. There is an upside: the work means we’re getting closer to the completion of the Crenshaw/LAX Line, which is scheduled to open in fall 2019.

 

24 replies

  1. Would it not make much more sense to have the G shuttle bus continue on to Hawthorne/Lennox during this closure? It is not very far away, but would result in a much more feasible trip for passengers headed toward Norwalk who would otherwise have to contend with yet another vehicle transfer.

    • Hi Allon,

      Thank you for the feedback. We have been working with LAWA to find out if there are opportunities to move this shuttle. However, at this time, LAWA intends to keep the G Shuttle at the Aviation/LAX Station. If this changes, we will provide that information in our upcoming outreach. Thank you.

      Steven Arellanes
      Writer, The Source

      • That’s typical of the LAWA philosophy. Just like their proposed Automated People Mover (APM), LAWA is always making things worse for passengers using public transit.

        The problems with the proposed APM and the Landside Access Modernization Program (LAMP) are too numerous to address here. It can be summarized in that the LAMP favors those using private automobiles over those using public transit, and even those using rental cars, staying in local hotels, and or their FlyAway service. These unfortunates will have to walk up to 1,000 ADDITIONAL feet just to reach their terminal, vs. ZERO today.

        • You are so right. It’s something I’ve been bringing up for years. The APM is terribly designed. People don’t realize it yet. They’re just so desperate to get something that they miss the big picture.

  2. The G Shuttle Bus to LAX should needs to be extended to the Hawthorne Station during this closure. This closure will impact hundreds of LAX employees and travelers, and could add up to 20 minutes of travel time in each direction. The G shuttle bus and Green Line runs every 20 minutes at most hours of the day. Is there a reason why the G shuttle bus couldn’t also pick up at Hawthorne Station?

    • Hi Carlos,

      Thank you for this suggestion. We have been working with LAWA to find out if there are opportunities to move this shuttle. However, at this time, LAWA intends to keep the G Shuttle at the Aviation/LAX Station. If this changes, we will provide that information in our upcoming outreach. Thank you.

      Steven Arellanes
      Writer, The Source

      • As noted above, LAWA favors those who use private automobiles over those using public transit. This is well documented in various LAWA documents.

  3. The Green Line shuttle is under @flyLAXairport. It’s probably better to blow up their Twitter feed as opposed to complaining to Metro.

  4. Hopefully Santa Monica and Culver City buses go to the Hawthorne station. Why isn’t the Crenshaw line opening up in segments like the other lines. The segment from Imperial to Century looks like it’s almost ready.

    • Hi Tim;

      They’ve made a lot of progress but it’s not ready yet and running trains on only a short stretch in the middle of the alignment wouldn’t serve much good. Also, it’s hard to open in segments as a lot of the electronic systems cover the entire line and not just part of the line.

      Steve Hymon
      Editor, The Source

      • The other rail lines were opened in segments. The Green Line could run up to Century then retrack and on to the next station.

  5. Why do the trains need to stop at Hawthorne/Lennox station? Why can’t they end be at Aviation/LAX Station? This will reduce the number of riders continuing on since a larger portion of riders end their journeys at Aviation. The work being done is on the west end of the Aviation station and there is a crossover on the east side of the station that can be used to route trains back onto the correct track.

  6. Metro needs to rethink the bus shuttle service. They should run one shuttle from Hawthorne to Aviation and back. This is where the bulk of the passengers go. Then they should run a second shuttle that goes to all of the stations. However, this second shuttle should pick up Aviation passengers at the corner of Imperial and Aviation not in the bus terminal area. The terminal is not designed for a through bus. The westbound trip requires a left turn from Imperial to Aviation, then a left turn into the station and when leaving either a left turn onto Aviation. All of these left turns plus the passenger drop-offs at Aviation will likely delay the bus 5 minutes or more.

  7. Will there be multiple buses running at the same frequency as the train? Train capacity exceeds bus capacities to the point where you’d need two bus shuttles per train.