Inglewood development, Orange Line bridge, South Bay Green Line: HWR, Oct. 9

Dept. of Dodger Stadium Express: The list of potential World Series opponents for the Dodgers has dropped to three with the elimination earlier today of the Boston Red Sox. We’ll know this evening whether the Yankees are also eliminated. ICYMI, the Dodger Stadium Express is a freebie bus to the ballpark from Union Station and Harbor Gateway. More info here. The next potential Dodger home game is Thursday versus the D-backs or, more likely, the first game of the NLCS on Saturday against the Cubbies or Nats.

Art of Transit: 

More pics from yesterday’s fun CicLAvia: Heart of LA event. Click above to see ’em. Photo by Steve Hymon/Metro.

This is a black neighborhood. You aren’t black. (There Goes the Neighborhood/KCRW & WNYC)

I give my highest recommendation to this episode about gentrification in Inglewood and how it is viewed by longtime African American residents. Development has been booming in the city with the new football stadium and accompanying mini-city under construction. At the same time, Silicon Beach workers have begun buying homes in Inglewood, which has had lower prices than other Westside hotspots.

The podcast is hosted by KCRW’s Saul Gonzalez and reporter Anna Scott. They cast a wide net and get a great variety of viewpoints on a difficult and emotional issue.

As you would expect, the Crenshaw/LAX Line gets several mentions, with the light rail line running along Florence Avenue through Inglewood. The rail line is planned to open in fall 2019.

Related: Urbanize LA looks at the ups and downs of the DTLA apartment market over the years. Supply and vacancy rates are currently up and there are some deals (relatively speaking) to be had, but Steven Sharp points out price dips typically don’t last.

Orange Line bridge to speed up buses, but what’s underneath? (Streetsblog LA)

In the wake of the news that Metro staff wants to build a mile-long bridge for the Orange Line over several intersections and add crossing gates to the busway to speed up buses, Joe Linton asks a good question heretofore that has been unasked: what’s underneath the bridge?

Joe writes:

Activating that space should be part of the overall design, not an afterthought. If Metro does not activate the space, homelessness and crime likely will. Features below the busway should not be so expensive as to break Metro’s budget or delay the project, but, as with Metro’s commitment to Transit-Oriented Communities, Metro can be a partner for projects that serve the community.

The Metro staff proposal is scheduled to go to the Metro Board this month, with the Board deciding whether to start the environmental review and preliminary design for the project.

New options revealed for Green Line South Bay extension (Urbanize LA)

Staff are still working on this, although the issue will be discussed with the Metro South Bay Service Council this month. The gistiness of it: the planned extension of the Green Line to Torrance could continue on the old rail right-of-way the Green Line already follows (called the Harbor Subdivision) or the line could be built partially on Hawthorne Boulevard.

We’ll have more on the Source when staff has refined some of its work. Here’s the project home page on metro.net. Under the Measure M spending plan, the project is scheduled to be complete in the 2030-32 timeframe, although Metro continues to look at ways to accelerate projects.

Pro tip: Metro has some new etiquette videos that are scheduled to drop tomorrow morning. They’re definitely worth a look!

 

 

5 replies

  1. I’ve seen that there’s testing happening in the metro rapid 770. Are they trying something new and innovative? Do you have any details on what they’re testing?

  2. Unless Metro decides to build a park and ride at the Torrance Transit Center, the Green Line should be extended down Hawthorne to the Del Amo Fashion Center.

    Many have suggested the “manifest destiny” of the Green is to eventually end at the Blue Line in Long Beach.

  3. Perhaps the Green line extension should be put on hold now that Redondo has banned development near the stations. Seems like a recipe for an expensive ghost train.

  4. While we’re on the topic of Metro service in the South Bay, why doesn’t Metro add a 732 Rapid line to complement the 232 route?
    I understand that the point of a rapid line is to provide ‘speedy service’ to other connecting Metro lines, but 232 already has a high frequency; it just makes a lot of stops.
    As much as I would like to have the potential 732 run the entire 232 route, it would be hard deciding whether the line would better serve the LAX/Redondo Beach area OR Long Beach/Redondo area 🤔. POINT IS: PLEASE consider a route 732! 😊