Fresh pics: Crenshaw/LAX Line’s Downtown Inglewood Station

Construction of the Crenshaw/LAX Line is moving along well with the project on track, pun intended, for a fall 2019 opening. Above are some new pics from the Downtown Inglewood Station that will be located on the north side of Florence Avenue near Market Street — i.e. just east of La Brea Avenue. The tracks will cross La Brea on a new rail bridge.

Here’s a map of the 8.5-mile project. At the southern end, the Crenshaw/LAX Line will have a junction with the Green Line, allowing trains to run from the Green Line’s Redondo Beach Station to the new underground Expo/Crenshaw Station, where riders can transfer to the Expo Line. Green Line trains will also be able to run from Norwalk to the new stations at Aviation/Century and the Airport Metro Connector/96th Street Transit Station — the station to be built that will serve as the transfer point to the people mover that will serve the LAX terminals.

18 replies

  1. I hope there’s going to be opaque glass on that awning on the platform! Waiting for a train in the hot sun won’t be fun.

  2. Is the Crenshaw line basically an expansion of the green line? Is it a one seat ride from Norwalk to the Expo line? If you are in Redondo beach will you always have to transfer at Aviation to continue to the Expo line or are there plans for straight through tracks?

    • There will be two operating patterns: A one-seat ride to/from Norwalk – Expo/Crenshaw, and a one-seat ride to/from Redondo Beach – Expo/Crenshaw.

      • Hi Aaron;

        I’m not sure about the Norwalk all the way to Expo/Crenshaw. I’ll check.

        Steve Hymon
        Editor, The Source

        • Metro’s most recent LRV fleet plan (from April 2015) shows three lines each operating at 12-minute peak headways: Crenshaw to Redondo Beach; Crenshaw to Norwalk; and Redondo Beach to Norwalk. That way, you will see a train every six minutes during peak periods anywhere on the Green or Crenshaw Lines. By comparison, the Green Line currently provides peak service every 7.2 minutes.

    • There will be multiple service patterns that share the Crenshaw and Green line infrastructure.

      There will be a service that goes Redondo to Expo.
      There will be a service that goes Redondo to Norwalk
      There will be a service that goes Norwalk to LAX. It is unclear whether that will also continue to Expo. It depends on ridership.

        • I see that I misread the LRV fleet plan. The actual plan includes these three lines:
          – Crenshaw: from Expo to Redondo Beach every 6 minutes;
          – Green Line: from Norwalk to Aviation every 12 minutes; and
          – Green Line: from Norwalk to Redondo Beach every 12 minutes.
          Therefore, the service frequency will be one train every six minutes during peak periods anywhere on the Green or Crenshaw Lines, except for the spur to Redondo Beach which will have one train every four minutes. This is absurd, of course, because that spur is by far the least productive of any segment of the Metro Rail system.

  3. Too bad the old Inglewood Rail Road station is gone, that would have been a nice place to have visited.

    Looks like they are using the old right of way.

  4. Steve: Have you found any info about the operating plans for the Crenshaw and Green Lines? As I noted, my info dates back to 2015, so it has probably been updated since then.

    • Operations folks say they don’t have a final operational plan yet — they’re evaluating different options. As you know, we’re still a couple years away from an opening although construction is going well. The project is being built so that trains can be moved between the Green Line and the new 8.5 miles of Crenshaw/LAX Line track.

      Steve Hymon
      Editor, The Source

      • Thanks, Steve.
        If you ask me (which I realize you didn’t) the operating plan should have two lines: Green Line from Norwalk to LAX; and Crenshaw Line from Expo to Redondo. The Green Line can operate 2-car trains at 6-minute headways, and the Crenshaw Line can operate 2-car trains at 12-minute headways. According to the ridership forecasts, these service levels should be sufficient to meet the demand for these corridors in the near term.