Expo Line resumes regular service after early morning power outage

7:45 a.m.: Power was restored to both tracks and regular service resumed. The incident began about 4:30 a.m. with a loss of electrical power delivered to the Expo Line between Clarington and Sepulveda in the city of Los Angeles. Two trains were stranded without power and were safely evacuated. Service was restored to one track at 6:18 a.m. and the other track at 6:56 a.m. Operations staff are investigating the cause of the incident.

6:55 a.m.: Power has been restored to both tracks, however, trains will share one track at Westwood/Rancho Park until rail staff is given an all clear to run regular service.

Update, 6:43 a.m.: Bus shuttles replace train service between Expo/Sepulveda and Westwood/Rancho Park.

Expo Line service between Expo/Sepulveda and Westwood/Rancho Park is suspended due to a loss-of-power issue in West L.A.. Trains are turning back at Palms and Expo/Bundy while bus shuttles are route to the affected service area. The rest of the line is experiencing up to 15 minute delays.

The cause of the issue is currently under investigation. For up-to-the minute service information, please follow us here or on Twitter @metrolosangeles or @metrolaalerts.




2 replies

  1. The incident began at 4:30 am, and at 6:15 not a single Metro bus driver, at the Sepulveda/Exposition bus stops knew what was going on! If Metro employees weren’t informed of the issue, I would not expect any other municipal service/operators to be informed. While there were electronic announcements, there wasn’t anyone to guide passengers to shuttle busses; and, as far as I could tell, the first shuttle bus arrived around 6:30, two hours after the incident! Metro really needs to get their act together when there are outages or incidences with their trains a lot quicker. I realize it takes time to get things organized, but they really need to be more efficient and timely. Overall, I find the train to be pretty reliable, within a couple of minutes, and don’t mind the odd delay; but when there’s no communication from the Metro employees, it really is frustrating for passengers.

  2. Does Metro always take more than 30 minutes to establish a bus bridge. Traffic was bad at 4:30. Does Metro have enough operators and buses to respond to multiple rail interruptions (perfect storms)? Why can’t Metro hire more driver to drive the empty buses in the bus yards while other passengers are struggling to go to work and school?