All-door boarding pilot program on Silver Line gets green light from Metro Board

Metro tested all-door boarding on some key stops on the Rapid 720 bus last summer on Wilshire Boulevard. The study below provides the official results: the boarding of buses was quicker, helping buses better stick to their schedules.

As a next step, Metro staff recommended testing all-door boarding along the entire Silver Line, set to take place this summer. The Metro Board of Directors approved this plan at today’s board meeting. They also approved the motion for staff to report back in 90 days on the possibility of expanding the all-door boarding pilot program to include the Reseda Boulevard Rapid 744, with testing on the line to start in Fall 2016.

As part of the test, Metro staff has recommended that all customers use TAP, and plans are already in place to put TAP vending machines at key Silver Line stations, including Harbor Gateway. TAP validators would also be installed at the front and rear doors of buses. Having all riders use TAP will make fare enforcement easier.

For more background on why the Silver Line was selected to be part of all-door boarding testing, check out this previous Source post.

Here’s video of the all-door boarding on the 720 last year:

And here’s the full Metro staff report evaluating last year’s all-door boarding pilot on the 720:

18 replies

  1. Its interesting that the Silver Line was supposed to BE the “articulated buses”, and yet NOT EVEN ONE has been even PUT on that route! Boarding by front and rear doors of a 40 foot bus is hardly something to be “promoting” when its the articulated buses that need this “All Door Boarding”

  2. how will this happen at CSULA Bussway station if there are no TAP card machines here on campus?

    • Hi Sergio,

      Staff is evaluating where TVMs are needed and also have plans to allow TAP cards to be loaded with cash fare on board Silver Line buses. More details will be posted closer to launch date.


      Anna Chen
      Writer, The Source

  3. For years we have done without TAP vending machines at Harbor Gateway Transit Center. Why? (Of course that is a redundant question as no one at Metro can intelligently and truthfully answer that question.) Now, all because of the Metro 950X blowing in to the HGTC we will have them? Fine. But how about San Pedro where the line begins on the Southbound side? Should there not be TAP vending machines there as well? The 910/950 (Silverline) is the most screwed up line in the system. The buses were once clean and the extra fare guaranteed an enjoyable rider experience. Now, 10 to 15 percent of the passengers weasel their way onto the bus without paying full fare. In complete violation of MTA rider regulations, riders are transporting garbage sized bags full of recyclables, often leaking. Drivers say nothing. Opening the back door will be a gateway (pun intended) to fare evasion. Lastly, the management of dispatching the buses is poor. On many occasions I see within a three or four minute period two or three Silverline busses on Sixth Street between Figueroa and Olive. Twice I have seen 4 buses within two minutes, all with passengers (not empties). Where are the Supervisors who are supposed to be monitoring the route?

  4. If you guys don’t put articulated buses doing this test during rush hour is gonna be a disaster. The 45ft buses won’t cut it.

  5. I am very curious to find out if the board approved all of the “recommended” June 2016 service changes. I hope the proposal for lines 190, 194, 270 and 460 are not approved.

  6. I found it interesting that you listed the Harbor Gateway Silver Line station as a “key” station. The only reason this is a busy station is that people are transferring from the Green Line where, presumably, (a) already have a TAP card or (b) could purchase one at a Green Line station. I suggest you put this one somewhere else more appropriate, such as Cal State L.A.

  7. If you allow boarding through unattended doors (or gates, or whatever), then you need some proof-of-payment mechanism to be able to verify that the people on the bus have paid their fare. However, this doesn’t mean necessarily requiring all passengers to use TAP. You could just require cash-paying customers to board in the front, and have the driver issue a paper ticket/receipt. That’s how it works in the Netherlands.

    • I have seen TAP type readers on rear doors on other systems. The doors swung out of the way and the TAP was next to the door on the outside.

      • Tap on the back door is fine, but if cash fares don’t receive a ticket or receipt then fare inspection won’t work — a person that’s already on the bus could just claim they paid cash.

    • Bob, you have your stations mixed up – the Harbor Gateway Transit Center is 2 Silver Line stops south of the Green Line / Silver Line hub.

  8. How is the fare difference going to work on the Silver Line? Monthly, weekly, and day passes along with transfers require an extra $0.75 to board. Are all of these people going to have to go through the front door only? If that’s the case, then having all door boarding is going to be a waist of time.

  9. As usual this is not a new idea, just a system that was abandoned with the creation of the MTA. The difference is that back door boarding was only done primarily in the CBD and was accomplished with a Traffic Loader that collected the fares, issued transfers and zone checks.

  10. Would really like to see some articulated buses on the Silver Line route particularly during rush hour where the bus is packed. If there’s ExpressLanes money to accomplish this, we’ll really see a benefit with ADB at busy stations as well as moving along huge loads of people.

  11. Wish there was a dedicated bus lane during Rush hour for silverline. Most of the time the silverline is stuck in traffic because people just pay to use the fast trak lane. Fast trak should only be for carpools during rush hour.

    • I’d like to see some real enforcement of the switchable transponder. With tolls hitting $15 it is certainly very tempting to “forget” to reset your transponder for a single person, plus it is difficult for an officer to visually verify proper transponder setting when cars are coming at you at 60 mph.