Taylor Yard Transit Village celebrates milestones

The project is on San Fernando Road, just south of Rio de Los Angeles State Park in the Cypress Park community of Los Angeles. Both the 94 Local Bus and 794 Rapid Bus run along San Fernando Road and connect downtown L.A. to Glendale, Burbank and the northeast San Fernando Valley.

Here’s the press release from McCormack Baron Salazar, Inc.:

Los Angeles (May 7, 2015) – Developer McCormack Baron Salazar, Inc. in partnership with the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro), and New Economics for Women today held a celebration to commemorate multiple milestones achieved in the development of the multi-phase Taylor Yard Transit Village.  The celebration marks the grand opening for the first two phases of the development and a groundbreaking for a third phase that will include 108 affordable apartments for seniors and 8,300 square feet of retail space. The completed projects already provide 155 affordable apartments for families.

Taylor Yard Transit Village is a walkable, multi-use, mixed-income, and mixed-generational community, designed to be inclusive for residents at all stages of life and levels of income.  When complete, the 16-acre community will provide 400 new homes, 25,000 square feet of retail space and over 1½ acres of green space on Metro-owned land designed with community walking trails, public art and native landscaping that complements the site’s proximity to the Los Angeles River.

“When we talk about a community for ‘everyone,’ this is what we are talking about,” explained Dan Falcon, Senior Vice President of McCormack Baron Salazar.  “The site plan incorporates new urbanist principals, which means it is walkable, safe, and feels like a traditional neighborhood.  It also includes universal site design with access for people of all abilities and transit access for non-drivers and people who choose not to drive. The site is LEED-ND certified and the two completed affordable rental buildings are being certified Gold Level under LEED for Homes, which help residents live healthier, save money and conserve resources. Every detail of this community was thought through to be inclusive and holistic.”

The first two phases, known as the Taylor Yard Apartments and Rio Vista Apartments, provide 155 new apartment homes affordable for families earning at or less than 60% of the Area Median Income.  The 100% affordable senior building, when completed in the summer of 2016, will provide 108 affordable 1 and 2 bedroom apartments reserved for senior citizens ages 62 and older.  All three phases are being developed by McCormack Baron Salazar in partnership with New Economics for Women.  Project partner, LA Urban Homes, is currently constructing 41 homes, known as RiverPark, and will be developing an additional 54 units in a subsequent phase. These market-rate homes are within the Taylor Yard Village master plan and are designed to complement the affordable rental community.

The site and design of Taylor Yard Transit Village is transit-accessible with connections to the regional transportation network through Metro’s Rapid and local bus service.  The development is the result of a successful public-private partnership between Metro and McCormack Baron Salazar.

The developments are the latest product of Metro’s Joint Development Program, which seeks to provide appropriate transit-oriented development adjacent to transit stations and corridors in an effort to reduce auto use and congestion.  This program has, over the years, been instrumental in bringing billions of dollars in development activity as well as much-needed affordable housing to Los Angeles County.

“One of the main goals of this development is to promote increased transit ridership by creating a strong, mixed-use node around transit investments,” said Metro Board Member Jacquelyn Dupont-Walker.  “Metro is now working on numerous transit-oriented developments along its transit network.  These projects are revitalizing communities with much needed housing, retail and other commercial opportunities.”

New Economics for Women serves both as a lender and a partner in the long-term management of the project with McCormack Baron Management. “We are proud to work as a community-based nonprofit economic development organization with such capable partners in a model affordable housing development,” remarked Magdalena Cervantes, Executive Director of New Economics for Women. “We are delighted to offer our programs and classes to our newest resident families and seniors in fulfillment of our commitment to help stabilize, protect and grow their economic assets over time.”

The three rental phases and site-wide infrastructure represent over $100 million in investment. Financing for the $15 million infrastructure was provided by the State of California Department of Housing & Community Development (HCD) Infill Infrastructure Grant Program and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Neighborhood Stabilization Program II (NSPII) funds through grantee New Economics for Women. The multi-family and senior housing is financed by public investment from the City of Los Angeles Housing & Community Investment Department (HCIDLA), the State of California HCD Transit Oriented Development Program, NSPII funds from New Economics for Women and allocations of Federal Low Income Housing Tax Credits by the State of California Tax Credit Allocation Committee (TCAC). Private financing and investment is provided by JPMorgan Chase Bank and JP Morgan, Enterprise Community Investment, Inc., and Hudson Housing Capital.

“At Enterprise, we are committed to ending housing insecurity, which means no more homelessness and no more families paying more than half of their income on housing,” said Jeff Schaffer, vice president and Southern California market leader, Enterprise Community Partners. “This new community brings us closer to that goal, and provides a vision for sustainable, equitable development along the L.A. River, including housing for people at all income levels.”

Taylor Yard Apartments has $21.1 million in total development costs, Rio Vista Apartments $29.7 million in total development costs and Taylor Yard Senior Housing has $33.9 million in total development costs.

McCormack Baron Salazar, Inc. is the nation’s leading for-profit developer of economically integrated urban neighborhoods. Since 1973, MBS has been a pioneer in community development and urban revitalization, with 175 projects in 41 cities and more than 18,800 high quality homes for families, children, seniors and veterans.  www.mccormackbaron.com | www.facebook.com/mccormackbaron | www.twitter.com/mccormackbaron

About New Economics for Women

In 2015, New Economics for Women (NEW) commemorates its 30th year of service utilizing innovative program models and strategies to empower low-wealth families.  Through its affordable housing developments, educational and technical training workshops and asset-building services, NEW has served more than 10,000 families in the Los Angeles region.  To learn more about NEW, please visit us at

www.neweconomicsforwomen.org | facebook.com/newecon4women | twitter.com/neweco4women.

About Enterprise

Enterprise works with partners nationwide to build opportunity. We create and advocate for affordable homes in thriving communities linked to jobs, good schools, health care and transportation. We lend funds, finance development and manage and build affordable housing, while shaping new strategies, solutions and policy. Over more than 30 years, Enterprise has created nearly 340,000 homes, invested $18.6 billion and touched millions of lives. Join us at www.EnterpriseCommunity.com | www.EnterpriseCommunity.org.

4 replies

  1. Umm…how is this a transit village?Any development with a bus line running nearby is a “transit village” now i guess. A sprawling car-oriented, “master planned” community in Riverside County is now a “transit village” if there is a bus stop outside its walled fortress. Is this a label meant to confuse or deceive people who are familiar with the phrase “Transit Oriented Development” or “TOD’s” for short. Metrolink trains pass nearby, but there isn’t a station anywhere within a reasonable walking distance.The design is pretty weak. It’s on par with one of Geoff Palmers craptacular developments. C’mon Metro.

  2. Nice, I’ve been wondering what that was. I ride by it everyday on the 94/794. It’s about a 5 minute bus ride west from the Gold Line Lincoln/Cypress station, for anyone who’s wondering. The 90/91 also pass by it.

  3. Yes, 10 million people living in LA County, 60% of them renters who do not want to be renters forever and population keeps rising. The solution is to build more attached 3 storey rental homes. Brilliant.

    When is LA going to start building 30-40 storey condos instead? Ah yes, of course, NIMBY backlashes who are against the idea of people actually owning a place of their own and will lay down any BS to prevent high-rise condos from being built. They’re more comfortable in making them indentured servants who limit the housing supply, making a vast majority of LA residents as renters whose owners can raise rent prices at their own discretion so they can make money by doing nothing.