Agenda for today’s Metro Board of Directors meeting

Metro Board Chair Eric Garcetti just dropped the metaphorical gavel, thereby beginning the February meeting of the Metro Board of Directors. The agenda for the meeting is above (pdf and web version).

The agenda includes links to Board motions and Metro staff reports. I encourage everyone to peruse through them — there’s usually a lot of interesting nuggets about various Metro programs and bus/train service.

You can also listen online by clicking here. No internet? No problem! Listen by phoning 213-922-6045.

As per usual, I’ll post about the meeting on The Source and I’ll live tweet any meeting highlights.

One note: Inglewood Mayor James T. Butts this month officially joined the Board. He replaces Santa Monica Councilmember Pam O’Connor.

The 13-member Metro Board is comprised of elected officials and appointees from throughout Los Angeles County. The Board has the final say on many of the large decisions at Metro as a way to provide accountability to the taxpaying and voting public. More about the Board here, including contact information.

5 replies

  1. Since 2001, One huge thing I’ve noticed, walking around to bus stops & mass transit centers, is the horrible lack of public facilities.
    The fancy Los Angeles HUGE http://WWW.MTA.NET Subway Stations , don’t even have restrooms, although billions were spent. Many more Subway Stations being built now & http://www.mta.net has failed to confirm restrooms. This is WRONG!👎

    I keep asking WHY @ transit Powers That Be, on Facebook & Twitter??? . It’s inhumane what they’ve done. We can be trapped Underground a long time, particularly with all the transferring to Los Angeles’ zillions of train lines.

  2. Kimberly,
    honestly I don’t think that restrooms would be a good idea on our L.A. subway system. For one, there are too many homeless / transients / drug users / criminals / other lunatics who ride the trains. Hence the restroom will become a total waste (literally!) in the matter or days. It will be unusable for a normal human being. And secondly, our subway system is not that large to require restrooms. The red line is only 29-minute long (from Union Station to North Hollywood), and that’s it. We don’t have a system like New York, Tokyo, Moscow, London, or even Washington DC.

    • NYC does have public restrooms open most of the day, in primary stations. This is their response to my inquiry:

      Response By Email (Sharon Adams) (03/09/2015 12:11 PM)
      This is in response to your recent e-mail to New York City Transit.

      Please note that New York City Transit is unable to maintain public restrooms in all subway stations because of security and maintenance concerns. However, every effort is made to have restrooms available for customers at terminal stations, transfer points and our more heavily used stations. While these restrooms are regularly inspected, they may sometimes be temporarily closed because of vandalism or for structural repairs. In addition, public restrooms are closed from 12:00 midnight until 5:00 a.m.