Go Metro to the Los Angeles Kings' SECOND Stanley Cup victory parade

Congratulations to the Los Angeles Kings, which won the Stanley Cup Friday night with a heart-stopping and breath-taking double-overtime win over the New York Rangers.

A victory parade will begin at noon Monday at 5th and Figueroa in downtown Los Angeles and travel south along Figueroa to L.A. Live and Staples Center — just as did when the Kings won the Cup in 2012. With downtown street closures in place and some inevitable bus detours, the best way to travel to the parade is to take Metro Rail or Metrolink into downtown. Metro will be adding rail service to accommodate the crowds.

The closest Metro Rail stations to the parade route are Pershing Square (Red/Purple Line), 7th/Metro Center (Red/Purple Line, Blue Line, Expo Line) and Pico (Blue Line, Expo Line). Metrolink riders can transfer to the Red/Purple Line at Union Station — both the Red and Purple Line serve all downtown Los Angeles stations.

There is also paid parking at Union Station — it’s $6 for the day.

Need to plan your transit trip? Try Metro’s Trip Planner or Google Transit. Here’s a map of Metro and Metrolink commuter train lines:


Click on the map to see a larger version.

If you’re having trouble viewing the map, click here for a pdf of the map. Or click here to see a pdf of only Metro routes.

Some specifics on individual Metro lines:

•The Expo Line runs from Culver City to 7th/Metro Center at the intersection of Figueroa and 7th streets, with a stop at Pico — two short blocks from L.A. Live and Staples Center. Timetable and parking info

•The Red Line subway runs from North Hollywood to Union Station and the Purple Line subway from Western Avenue in Koreatown to Union Station. Two stations are near the parade route — Pershing Square is near the beginning of the route and 7th/Metro Center is near the mid-way point.  Timetable and parking info.

•The Orange Line busway runs between Warner Center and the North Hollywood Red Line station and has free parking in several lots. Timetable and parking info

•The Blue Line runs between downtown Long Beach and 7th/Metro Center at 7th and Figueroa, with a stop at Pico, two short blocks from L.A. and Staples Center. There are free parking lots along the route, as well as paid parking in downtown Long Beach. Timetable and parking info

•The Green Line runs between Redondo Beach and Norwalk and offers transfers to the Blue Line. There is also free parking at several lots at stations. Timetable and parking info

•The Gold Line runs to Union Station from both Pasadena and East Los Angeles. There are several free parking lots or garages along the route, as well as street parking and paid parking in downtown Pasadena. Timetable and parking info.

•Metrolink and Amtrak trains serve Union Station, with connections to the Red/Purple Line subway to reach downtown L.A. destinations. Metrolink schedules and Amtrak.com

A single ride on Metro Rail is $1.50 per single bus or train ride. If you don’t already have a reloadable TAP card, you will need to purchase one, available for $1 from TAP vending machines at all Metro Rail and Orange Line stations, in addition to El Monte Station. If you need to transfer, the best choice is a day pass for $5, also available at all ticket vending machines. Tip: don’t throw out your TAP card when done — you can use it in the future!

On the go and need rail and bus arrival/departure times from your current location? Try Metro’s app for smartphones. Android version and iPhone version

5 replies

  1. I know you made a few parking suggestions in here, but any others? NoHo and Universal always fill up on weekdays with commuters, so I’m thinking of parking at Van Nuys? What’s the weekday parking situation like there? Normally when I go Metro, I park at NoHo, Chatsworth, or Reseda.

    • I haven’t seen the Orange Line parking lots lately, but I have seen spaces in some during weekdays. But I don’t want to make promises. There could be some long-term street parking near some of them, however.

      Steve Hymon
      Editor, The Source