Final Update: Blue Line resuming normal service

UPDATE 7:47 p.m.: Issues with the overhead power system supply near Wardlow Station have been resolved. The Metro Blue Line is resuming normal service at this time. Metro again thanks all those affected for their patience this evening.

UPDATE 7:00 p.m.: Work continues on repairs to the damaged section of the overhead power supply system near Wardlow Station. Metro Blue Line delays have been reduced to up to 12 minutes.

Since approximately 4:30 this afternoon, the Metro Blue Line has been experiencing delays of up to 20 minutes due to an issue with the overhead power supply system near Wardlow Station.

The issue is occurring specifically on the Northbound track, requiring both Long Beach-bound and Downtown L.A.-bound trains to share the Southbound track as they navigate around the incident track. Trains are also holding at Del Amo Station for a few minutes for equipment inspection necessitated by the power supply system issue.

Unfortunately, field personnel have confirmed repairs will be fairly complicated, meaning the Blue Line will continue to experience delays of 20 minutes through this evening.

Metro would like to thank customers for their patience as we work to restore regular Blue Line service as fast as possible. For continued updates, check back here at The Source or follow Metro on Twitter @metrolosangeles or @metroLAalerts.

Categories: Transportation News

2 replies

  1. The most frustrating part of waiting nearly an hourfor a south bound train at Del Amo and Wardlow without any information. If you announce what is happening, passengers would be more content. The south bound train was then standing room only to Long Beach and we are 69 years old with airport baggage.

  2. Judy,

    The problem will become worse when the new proposed gradual fare hike to $2.50 happens. Because, under the new fare hike rule changes, even though you can get anywhere in the system for $2.50, transfers included, the gotcha is that you have a 90 minutes time limit to get to your transfer point or you’ll be dinged another $2.50.

    And the 90 minute countdown happens once you tapped through the gates, NOT when the train comes. The 90 minute time window has no correlation to when you board the train, it’s going to be dependent on what time you tapped through the gates.

    So the situation you describe, after you TAPed your card and you spent 60 minutes just waiting at the platform due to Metro delays that are beyond your control, inevitably means you have only 30 minutes left to get to your transfer point.

    I’m sure as time progresses, Metro riders will begin to notice that “travel anywhere within the system, transfers included all for $2.50” will not cut out to be because it’s all going to be dependent on the 90 minute time limit, which in itself is going to vary widely depending on street traffic conditions for buses and uncontrollable delays on the light rail system. At least on buses, the 90 minute time window is understandable because the countdown starts when you TAP as you board the bus, but on light rail, tap at the gates has no consistency when you physically board the train.