Transportation headlines, Friday, February 28

Have a transportation-related article you think should be included in headlines? Drop me an email! And don’t forget, Metro is on TwitterFacebook and Instagram. Pick your social media poison! 

One way to make traffic vanish: long exposures! The view late Thursday from The Source's window on the world. Photo by Steve Hymon/Metro.

One way to make traffic vanish: long exposures! The view late Thursday from The Source’s window on the world. Click above to see larger. Photo by Steve Hymon/Metro.

The transit plaza at Union Station last night. Photo by Steve Hymon/Metro.

The transit plaza at Union Station last night. Photo by Steve Hymon/Metro.

CicLAvia: our story

Click above to check out a very nice photo essay.

Google says $6.8 million for Muni youth passes just a start (San Francisco Chronicle) 

Wow. The tech giant donates the money to the agency that runs buses, light rail and streetcars — enough money to cover two years of free transit for low- and middle-class kids aged five to 17. The donation comes at a time when Google and other tech firms are being criticized for their free shuttles that take employees from San Francisco to offices south in Silicon Valley and the area. With real estate prices soaring in S.F., many citizens are feeling squeezed out and say the shuttles — with free wifi — make it easy for wealthy employees to live in the city and commute south.

Legislation would change composition of Metro Board (L.A. Streetsblog) 

Thoughtful post by Damien Newton on the implications and reasoning behind AB 1941, a bill by Assemblyman Chris Holden that would have the Legislature appoint two members to the Metro Board. Holden tells Streetsblog that it would help provide more equitable representation around the county and help plan projects that extend beyond the borders of Los Angeles County. Metro Board Member Ara Najarian, however, responds this way:

“The last thing we need on this already political board, is to inject two new players with no stakeholders and no constituents to answer to, only the politicos in Sacramento,” writes Ara Najarian, Glendale City Councilmember and the representative to the Metro Board from the San Fernando Valley Council of Governments. “A huge mistake and not a well thought out piece of legislation. Now, if we wanted to add directors who actually had constituents to answer to…then fine.”

I couldn’t agree more. Having two people on the Board who don’t even have to live in the region seems like a good way of asking for trouble when it comes to doling out contracts and making other decisions that could impact fund-raising for elected officials in Sacramento. Unless I’m hugely mistaken, I don’t see this bill going anywhere.

America’s 20 fastest-growing cities (Forbes)

Los Angeles didn’t make the list. But San Jose, Phoenix, Houston, Atlanta and Ogden (Utah) did.

Rep. Bill Shuster on federal role in transportation

The Chairman of the House of Representatives’ Transportation Committee talks to highway officials in Washington D.C. Rep. Shuster will play a critical role when it comes to passing the next multi-year transportation spending bill. President Obama’s bill proposal includes the America Fast Forward initiative. The most interesting remarks — embracing the federal role in mobility for goods and people — is after the introductory remarks.