It's the last week of the "12 Days of Metro"…and here's your clue for Day 8

Down to the final five! The clue for Day 8:

“It’s Time” to visit this store and see what L.A. has in common with San Diego and Buffalo.

Here’s how to play.

1. Follow @metrolosangeles on Instagram
2. Solve the daily riddle
3. Take a photo of your TAP card at that location
4. Post it to your Instagram (make sure your profile is public!)
5. Tag @metrolosangeles and #tapandsave

Submissions showing the correct location will be entered to win the daily prize. Contest closes at 6 p.m. Today’s prize is valued at $30. For official contest rules, click here. Winners are chosen at random by a dog. (Literally.)

As for the winner of Day 7…just waiting for that person to confirm his existence. In the meantime, the prize waiting to be sent out is 2 tickets to a Tuesday evening show of The Lion King at the Hollywood Pantages Theatre.

If you didn’t win, don’t worry – you can still save 15% on tickets to Tuesday shows of The Lion King with Metro!

3 replies

  1. Uh, you DO realize that the traditional 12 days of Christmas are the liturgical season that begins Christmas day, and ends on Epiphany eve, right? Liturgically speaking, it’s still Advent for another 9 days.

    (And yes, I voiced the same nerdly complaint to the cartoonist who draws, if memory serves correctly, “Mother Goose & Grimm,” for doing a series of 12 Christmas puns while it was still Advent.)

    • Hi James,

      Thanks for the info! I actually have no clue as I’m not religious in the least and only know the bare bones of most doctrine. Full disclosure, the name of the contest was chosen solely based off the song “The 12 Days of Christmas” – which I sang each year all through grade school.

      Anna Chen
      Writer, The Source

  2. Well, that’s what it refers to. There is some speculation (but no hard evidence, and Snopes classifies it as false) that it originated as some sort of memory trick for persecuted Roman Catholics to pass on certain teachings at a time when they were being persecuted in England, but there is no doubt that the title and structure of the song is (like the title of one of Shakespeare’s comedies) a reference to the 12-day liturgical season of Christmas.

    Incidentally, “thinking liturgically” can be a major advantage where Christmas gifts are concerned: if you think liturgically, then regardless of what Madison Avenue says, as long as a gift arrives before Epiphany (which is January 6th), IT’S NOT LATE!