Transportation headlines, Tuesday, i.e. 11/12/13

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ART OF SUNRISE: Nice one a little after 6 a.m. this morning in lovely downtown Montrose, served by the 90 bus; downtown Montrose is where Will Ferrell went streaking in “Old School.” Photo via submission by Maricela Gomez.

Vote on 405 toll lanes in O.C. is delayed (L.A. Times)

The Orange County Transportation Authority will not vote until Dec. 9 on plans to improve traffic on the 405 freeway. Among the alternatives: converting the existing HOV lane to a congestion pricing lane, adding a second toll lane and adding a general purpose lane for 14 miles of the 405 south of the L.A. County line (between the 605 and 73 freeways).

Who knows if OCTA will go for it? The L.A. Times worked the phrase “Lexus Lanes” in the second graph of its article and will likely keep doing so — especially with cities along the route opposing this alternative. Of course, lost in the heat is that no general purpose lanes would be lost and under the controversial option, a general lane would be added. As for carpoolers and who pays tolls and who does not, those decisions have not yet been made.

This staff report from OCTA lays out the different alternatives — see page 3.

The obvious reader question: what does this mean for the 405 north of the O.C.-L.A. boundary? At this point, nothing. The Sepulveda Pass Transit Corridor project, which is nowhere near the O.C. line, is looking at a possible toll tunnel to help pay for a transit project — but that is one of several concepts that have been studied on a preliminary basis. That project is still in its very early phases and will need a lot more funding before being built; that’s the reason a public-private partnership is being explored.

Garcetti seeks to expand Hyperion Bridge deadline (L.A. Streetsblog)

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti wants to delay firming up plans to renovate the bridge over the Los Angeles River for more community review of the current plan. Cycling advocates have been very critical of the city Bureau of Engineering’s plans, saying they serve motorists but not pedestrians or those on bikes.

Report from the California bike summit (L.A. Times)

Editorial page writer Robert Greene attended the summit in Oakland and offers a few impressions. Among them: Long Beach is probably tops in building bike infrastructure. Another: Design really matters and that cycling is a vital way of getting around for some low-income communities that have lost jobs and have poor transit service. He also ends his piece with a chide of sorts concerning safety. Thoughtful piece.

Bacon deodorant: coming soon! (JD Foods)

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I can’t wait for our first complaint about this, uh, exciting new hygiene product. From the product description:

Using POWER BACON will probably make everyone drawn to you like you were the most powerful magnet on Earth. And by everyone, we mean friends, acquaintances, beautiful strangers, dogs, bears, swamp alligators, lions and even pigs. It’s like an aphrodisiac for your armpits. But use your new power wisely, because with great bacon power comes great baconsponsibility.

There’s also this:

Do not eat or hike in the woods without a firearm while wearing POWER BACON.

Before putting bacon deoderant into your grooming lineup, you may want to consider the Metro Customer Code of Conduct, which has this to say on the issue of odors:

6‐05‐160 Odors
A. A person may not be in a Metro facility or vehicle with an unavoidable grossly repulsive odor so extreme it causes a nuisance, unreasonably interferes with the use, operation, or enjoyment
of the Metro facilities or vehicles for Metro representatives or patrons, or creates an unsafe
35 condition.
B. Extreme odors may arise from a variety of sources, including one’s body, possessions, clothing, food, chemicals, or accompanying animals.

4 replies

    • Dr. M,

      Are they intended to surprise people or are they clearly labeled as Sriracha candy canes? Because I’d hate to be caught off guard by one, but it sounds interesting!

      Anna Chen
      Writer, The Source

  1. There are people riding Metro all the time that smell way worse than bacon and metro never does anything about it. I have seen people get off the bus or cower at the other end of the vehicule to avoid the smell. Yet I have never seen a metro employee ask a smelly person to exit. Just sayin’

  2. The boxes are labeled but the individual candy canes are not. It is up to the buyer to decide how to use them.