Another tool in the online tool box for Bay Area transit riders: train crowding predictions

Interesting news release from our friends at BART in the Bay Area on a new feature that predicts train crowding. The release is below — what'cha think, L.A. riders? A feature you would like to see here?

Visitors to the BART website and mobile site can now get a snapshot of estimated crowding levels on trains when they plan a trip.

The beta version of the estimated crowding feature launched Tuesday. When you use the BART QuickPlanner, your trip plan will show an icon with three heads, two heads or one head – indicating “heavy crowding expected,” “moderate crowding expected,” or “light crowding expected.”

The new feature is a response in part to record ridership levels on BART, giving riders another tool to find a train with more space, if they have flexibility to make their trip a little earlier or later.

The crowding level estimates are based on historic data; BART’s web team worked closely with BART’s scheduling department to coordinate the new feature in an effort to give riders more choices.

“Although the data is not real time, the historic data we're using is generally predictive, and customers will be able to see which trips are less crowded than others,” said Timothy Moore, BART website manager.

QuickPlanner trip plans also tell riders whether bicycles are allowed on BART at a particular time or not. The crowding level feature is also intended to provide guidance to bicyclists, because even outside commute period blackouts, bicyclists are instructed to “only board cars that can comfortably accommodate you and your bicycle,” under the BART bike rules.

“This feature will be useful to bicyclists, because on the trains marked ‘heavy crowding expected,’ it may not be possible to bring a bike on board,” said Steve Beroldo, BART’s bicycle program manager. “It will be a much better option to choose a train with the ‘light crowding expected’ icon,” he said.

BART is evaluating the results from a bike pilot held March 18-22 allowing bikes on board at all times (with some restrictions). The results of the pilot will be presented to the Board of Directors at a future meeting, with opportunity for public comment, before determining what happens next with bikes on BART.

 

Categories: Technology

3 replies

  1. HOW ABOUT JUST FIXING NEXT TRIP FIRST, SO IT DOES NOT HAVE GOST BUSES ARRIVING AND BUSES ARRIVING WHEN THEY ARE NOT LISTED

  2. BART can because everyone is required to tap-out with their Clipper Cards. We don’t have that system here. How will Metro be able to do something similar to this when Metro doesn’t do tap-out?

  3. I would also prefer that NextTrip worked as it’s supposed to. Lots of ghost buses out there. Also, whatever happened to the next bus arriving displays on the Rapid Bus bus shelters? When was that supposed to happen?