New sculpture is installed at Artesia Transit Center*

Detail of Paraje—Spanish for a resting place between two destinations—a 10ft h x 10ft w cast stainless steel sculpture containing imagery inspired by the nearby Gardena Willows Wetlands. Preserve.

Detail of Paraje—Spanish for a resting place between two destinations—a 10ft h x 10ft w cast stainless steel sculpture containing imagery inspired by the nearby Gardena Willows Wetlands. Preserve.

A new sculpture by Alison Saar is now installed at Artesia Transit Center (currently in transition to being renamed Harbor Gateway Transit Center). Entitled Paraje — Spanish for a resting place between two destinations — the cast stainless steel sculpture contains imagery inspired by the nearby Gardena Willows Wetlands Preserve.

Saar’s sculpture was commissioned by Metro’s art program as part of a broad series of Metro improvements to the station’s physical environment. Other improvements include enhanced station lighting, upgraded wayfinding signage and new CCTVs and digital message signs.

Scroll below for photos documenting the installation of the sculpture. Click here for a previous Source post about the artwork.

The 12-inch stainless steel base of the sculpture shown just before it is installed. The base contains a quote by Japanese poet Saigo.

The 12-inch high stainless steel base of the sculpture shown just before it is installed. The base contains a quote by Japanese poet Saigo.

Workers set the sculpture into its base

Workers set the sculpture into its base

The artist, Alison Saar, after her sculpture has been installed.

The artist, Alison Saar, after her sculpture has been installed.

Detail of Paraje. The sculpture’s west face depicts a willow tree, while on the east face a willow spirit emerges mysteriously from the tree. The folds of the willow spirit’s dress become the roots of the tree and the spirit’s upheld arms become branches.

Detail of Paraje. The sculpture’s west face depicts a willow tree, while on the east face a willow spirit, shown here, emerges mysteriously from the tree. The folds of the willow spirit’s dress become the roots of the tree and the spirit’s upheld arms become branches.

Detail of Paraje, depicting the willow marshes the artist discovered in the area during her research for the project.

Detail of Paraje, depicting the willow marshes the artist discovered in the area during her research for the project.

14 replies

  1. This is a nice artwork. But I have a general criticism of the “Arts in Transit” programs.

    In the old days, the builders of mass transit *integrated the artwork into the station designs*, as with the fabulous mosaics in the IRT stations in New York, or the Leslie Green London Underground station designs, or any of several famous architectural designs used for train stations (“Richardson Romanesque”, etc.)

    Lately, the “arts for transit” have mostly been standalone artworks, separate from and not integrated with the stations. This kind of misses the point. The City Beautiful movement called for each station to *be* an artwork, and that is what Arts in Transit should do.

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