New sculpture to be installed at Artesia Transit Center*

Saar’s work in progress at the fabricator’s studio. A full-scale rendition of the sculptural windscreen had been carved in foam. From this carving, a mold was made—shown above. The final artwork is cast in stainless steel and measures 10ft. h x 10ft. w.

Saar’s work in progress at the fabricator’s studio. A full-scale rendition of the sculptural windscreen had been carved in foam. From this carving, a mold was made—shown above. The final artwork is cast in stainless steel and measures 10ft. h x 10ft. w.

A new sculpture by Los Angeles artist Alison Saar will be installed later this month at Metro’s Artesia Transit Center (*currently in transition to being renamed Harbor Gateway Transit Center). Entitled Paraje—Spanish for a resting place between two destinations—the cast stainless steel sculpture contains imagery inspired by the nearby Gardena Willows Wetlands Preserve.

The sculpture’s west face depicts a willow tree, while on the east face a willow spirit emerges mysteriously from the tree. The folds of the willow spirit’s dress become the roots of the tree and the spirit’s upheld arms become branches. The Preserve is one of the few remaining pristine willow marshes in Los Angeles, and willow groves, Saar learned, are known for their soothing shade.

Saar designed the sculpture so it would also serve as a windscreen, located on the busy west end of the station platform. It will be mounted on a 12-inch stainless steel base containing a quote by Japanese poet Saigo:

By the roadside

Cool spring water flowing

In the shade of a willow

I stop

And linger.

“My artwork will be a reminder of the terrain’s natural history and provide passengers with shade and protection from the sun and wind,” states Saar. “Perhaps viewers will imagine an earlier time when the area was a haven of marshlands, and perhaps encourage investigation of the nearby Preserve.”

Saar’s sculpture was commissioned by Metro Art as part of a series of Metro improvements to the station’s physical environment.

Alison Saar exhibits nationally and internationally and her work is included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art, The Whitney Museum, and The Hirshhorn Museum.  Her work was recently featured at Otis College of Art and Design’s Ben Maltz Gallery.  She is recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

6 thoughts on “New sculpture to be installed at Artesia Transit Center*

    • Hi Dana and Robb;

      Correct, that is the new name. But we’re still transitioning over to it and it’s still called “Artesia Transit Center” on some Metro materials — such as this Silver Line map. So we’re doing a soft transition on The Source until the new name is more universal.

      Best,

      Steve Hymon
      Editor, The Source

  1. We now need art work at the other Silver line stations and install ticket vending machines.

  2. It has been 4 YEARS since the Silver Line began and YET LITTLE IMPROVEMENTS HAVE BEEN Made. The stations in the el monte busway (CSULA AND LAC Medical Center) need MAJOR upgrades. The Silver line stops in Downtown LA could have their own designated bus stop shelters with benches. We need ticket vending machines now for the Silver Line!! It takes too long to pay on board when there is a very long line.

Comments are closed.