Architects present roadmap to the future of L.A. Union Station; invite public to share the ride

Gruen Associates Partner Debra Gerod, AIA, LEED AP, leads panel presentation of  the master plan process for Los Angeles Union Station 40+ acre site at community meeting held Dec. 4 at Metro HQ in downtown Los Angeles.

Gruen Associates Partner Debra Gerod, AIA, LEED AP, leads panel presentation of the master plan process for Los Angeles Union Station 40+ acre site at community meeting held Dec. 4 at Metro HQ in downtown Los Angeles.

Already into the details of data collection and analysis, the master plan team for the Los Angeles Union Station and the 40+ acres that surround it opened the floor to the public Tuesday night at a community meeting held to launch public involvement in the planning process.

Architects from the Grimshaw/Gruen and Metro master plan team played to a full house in the board room of Metro HQ in the hour-long presentation and then invited the public to visit interactive stations by topic: master planning process, mobility, neighborhood connections, station architecture and the passenger experience.

Described as a roadmap to the future of the historic rail station, the master planning process will encompass passenger and other circulation improvements as well as longer term rail and joint development opportunities, including an analysis of high speed rail station alternatives.

The master plan team will consider ways to create better access for pedestrians and bicyclists and clearer linkages among the transit modes on site. Finally, the master plan team is charged with exploring close linkages with Union Station’s neighbors and downtown itself that will support and catalyze activities in the city around the station.

Here is the presentation from the master plan team:

Los Angeles Union Station Master Plan – Dec. 4, 2012

 

2 thoughts on “Architects present roadmap to the future of L.A. Union Station; invite public to share the ride

  1. Pingback: Today’s Headlines | Streetsblog Los Angeles

  2. I wasn’t able to make it to the meeting, but one thing I find inconvenient about Union Station is the poor cell phone reception. Since I often want to meet people who are arriving there (by train or FlyAway or metro), it’s often fairly important to be able to place and receive calls! Whatever technology is used in San Francisco for phone reception in BART should be able to be adopted in Union Station too, though I don’t know the cost of it.

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