Metro to hold community meetings on East San Fernando Valley Transit Corridor

Here’s the news release from Metro about the project study that includes transit improvements on Van Nuys Boulevard:

Metro, in cooperation with the City of Los Angeles, will hold three community meetings in April to update the public on the Alternatives Analysis (AA) study that is evaluating options to improve north-south travel opportunities in the East San Fernando Valley and provide connections to the regional transportation network. The AA study is a precursor to the draft environmental document.

In October 2011, a series of community meetings were held introducing this transit study which initially included only the Van Nuys Boulevard corridor between Ventura Boulevard and the I-210 freeway.  As a result of public input, the project study area has now been expanded to include Sepulveda Boulevard and the Sylmar/San Fernando Metrolink Station as a northern terminus/origination point.

Initial alternatives under consideration as part of the AA include Bus Rapid Transit (BRT), Light Rail Transit (LRT), Streetcar, a “No Build” alternative and a Transportation Systems Management (TSM) alternative aimed at better managing the flow of traffic along the corridor.

The community meetings will take place from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the following locations. Information at all the community meetings will be the same.

Thursday, April 12, 2012, City of San Fernando Regional Pool Facility, Aquatic Center Multipurpose Room, 201 Park Avenue, San Fernando.

Tuesday, April 17, 2012, Cathedral of St. Mary Byzantine Catholic Church Auditorium, 5329 Sepulveda Boulevard, Sherman Oaks.

Wednesday, April 18, 2012, Valley Presbyterian Hospital Auditorium, Jean & David Fleming Health Education Center, 15107 Vanowen Street, Van Nuys.

For additional information on the East San Fernando Valley Transit Corridor Study visit metro.net/EastSFVTransit or call 818-276-3233.

5 replies

  1. this line needs to be combined with the 405 line project. To be built as light rail in 3 segments:
    1/ Orange line south to Expo. (crossing Purple)
    2/ Orange line north to Sylmar Metrolink/ HSR station crossing Amtrak/Metrolink at Van Nuys
    3/ Expo south to LAX connecting with Green and Crenshaw

    Would probably be a line with huge ridership as long as it is strung together as one continuous line. Subway would have been nice, but light rail would work best- more comfort for a long distance vs. a bus and you can run the line on surface in the SFV, saving the $ for tunneling under Sepulveda pass into WLA.

  2. Can you clarify whether Sepulveda is included as an alternative to Van Nuys or a southerly extension? What is the study’s southern boundary now? Has Metro responded to the overwhelming public comment to combine the project with the Sepulveda Pass study? Thanks.

    • Hi Eric,

      I’m pretty sure that Sepulveda is not intended as an alternative — I believe this expands the study area. As for your other question, I don’t know the answer at this time. I’ll be getting more info as we get closer to the public meetings.

      Steve Hymon
      Editor, The Source

  3. I second what mark r said. As a valley resident, it would be a huge asset to have a continuous rail line from the valley to west LA and would generate very high ridership. But I think even in the valley there should be SOME grade separated sections because otherwise we would have over 10 miles of continuous street running. That means the train can go no more than 35 miles per hour for a very long and unprecedented distance. Unless there is traffic light preemption, we will end up with a very low average speed for a rail line that stretches the north-south length of the valley and stops at lights. This would result in not being much faster than current metro rapid buses in the valley section. To save money for the tunneled section from Ventura Blvd. southward, I think the line could be elevated for some of its length along Van Nuys.

  4. What should also be studied and built is adding a track that connects the Antelope and Ventura metrolink lines so commuters can have a better seamless one ride from the Lancaster/Palmdale to the San Fernando Valley. The track can be built as a wye at Burbank Junction.