Art for the Expo Line's La Cienega/Jefferson station: Engraved in Memory by Daniel González

Artisans at the artwork fabricator, Mosaïka Art & Design, working on Gonzalez’s art panels. Highly skilled artisans translated the artist’s original black and white linoleum prints into pieces of hand-carved, hand-glazed porcelain.

Daniel González’s artwork for La Cienega/Jefferson Station illustrates the history of the Ballona Creek and the surrounding environs, including the people who have called the area home.

The art panels reference the Mission and Californio periods, the film industry and contemporary art scene, as well as the Baldwin Hills dam break of 1967. The Ballona Creek flows through several art panels, constant and recognizable, visually linking the images across time. (Here’s a link to more information about Gonzalez’s work for La Cienega/Jefferson Station.)

Detail of Engraved in Memory at La Cienega/Jefferson Station

Artisan at Mosaïka Art & Design working on an art panel

More photos of the artwork are after the jump.

Artisans at Mosaïka Art & Design working on an art panel

An art panel sits on the back of a truck, just before it is installed at La Cienega/Jefferson Station. This panel depicts the 1932 Olympic Village, which was built in the Baldwin Hills. The concept of the Olympic Village originated with the 1932 Olympic games in Los Angeles. It later became the norm for the host country to build accommodations in this fashion for visiting athletes.

The art panel pictured above, now in its new home on the station platform.

Other Art for the Expo Line stories on the Source:
LA Metro Lotería by Jose Lozano
Urban Dualities by Samuel Rodriguez
The Intimacy of Place by Christofer Dierdorff
Ephemeral Views by Ronald Llanos
On Saturdays by Robbert Flick
Neighborhood Reconstructed by Jessica Polzin McCoy
Willie Middlebrook’s Designs for Expo/Crenshaw Station

3 thoughts on “Art for the Expo Line's La Cienega/Jefferson station: Engraved in Memory by Daniel González

  1. Many people are anxiously awaiting the opening of the Expo Line, what is taking so long?

  2. This sounds really cool, especially the part about the creek flowing through the art panels. I would like to see just how the flowing water links images through time. That is far out.

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