Expo Line train testing update

Here’s the latest update from the Expo Line Construction Authority, which is building the project from downtown L.A. to Culver City:

Click above for a larger image.

Categories: Projects

Tagged as:

4 replies

  1. “Testing, Testing”, but not one day closer to ACTUALLY RUNNING, is it? If so, then why is it taking till NOVEMBER before this so-called “new” line will be open (especially if its listed on the “expoline.org” web-site, as being “90% done”!). Why have all these “testing schedules” posted, if there is no real improvement in getting closer to the alleged opening date of this rail line (which will probably be pushed out to Thanksgiving, then Christmas, then after the Presidential election!). Will the boon-doggle never stop?

  2. Well John, they are numerous testing on the system itself. They testing things like trains entering and leaving platforms, gate crossings, signals. Plus their are two stations that are incomplete. The Farmdale station and the Culver City station. They are currently laying track at Culver City and farmdale should be just about done. Keep you hopes man. I think the line will be ready by Mid-November and Culver City Station by January

  3. They are also testing the Positive Train Control at the merge with the Blue Line, and this should NOT be rushed. They have to test this while the Blue line is running, at times. They are getting to all the details now, all the things that are easy to forget, seem small, but can create accidents and injuries. Of course, during these tests, they will find things that aren’t working as they should, and they have to fix it, then test it again.

    If this were to be all rushed, you know who would be the first to complain when an accident occurs or the PTC fails or the live catenary wires fall to electrocute someone or the attempt to run single track results in disaster because they didn’t test it and all that SOFTWARE that has to be tested and adjusted and re-adjusted to provide the fastest ride with the greatest safety and prevent a driver from exceeding speed limits for the train.

    This is more complex than you think. I didn’t even get into the paint of the crosswalks that residents don’t like because they feel it looks crappy or isn’t safe.

  4. Pedestrians arguing ove cross-walk paint should have to pay for it themselves, along with “artwork” that is placed at each station (why is THAT considered part of the construction process?).