Take our Why I Cycle survey

Hollywood/Western Biker Chick

Do you love to bring your bike on Metro? Tell us why!

Bikes are huge right now! CicLAvia was a rousing success, Metro just lifted its rush hour ban on bikes on trains and National Bike Month is days away. Because of this we thought it was a great time to launch a new series on the Source titled “Why I Cycle” to spotlight local bicyclists who have made the daring leap from car-dependent to car-free or at least car-light in Los Angeles.

If CicLAvia is any indication, cycling in L.A. has never been more popular (or important in light of rising gas prices, congestion and air pollution). More and more people are utilizing bikes for fun and transportation, and we’d like to reveal how they roll through personal accounts of bicycle use, and in particular, connections with L.A.’s Metro system.

Point your browser to thesource.metro.net/cyclesurvey, fill out the survey and we’ll spotlight your own story on the Source. We’ll publish survey responses over the next month to inspire and guide others in L.A. who are considering joining L.A.’s two-wheeled revolution.

And don’t forget, Metro is celebrating Bike Week L.A. on May 16-20.

5 thoughts on “Take our Why I Cycle survey

  1. I’m against this idea. Some of the trains are crowded as it is. Bringing bicycles into the trains just crowd up more space even if you remove the seats. Ridership is just going to increase so it only makes things worse as time goes on.

    I’d rather have Metro convert some of the space used for parked cars into secure bike lockers so that I can just leave my bike at one station and take out another bike at my other station: one bike to home station, and another bike at my work station. I’d be glad to pay $5/month at each location to keep my two bikes at two different locations, so long as they are stored safely and securely.

  2. I love taking my bike along with Metro trains to and from work. I travel from Pasadena to Culver city, it is working out very well so far.

    Sometimes the trains will be exceedingly packed with people, as Y Fukuzawa pointed out, in these instances I often find myself just waiting for the next train, generally the next is less crammed with people. Y Fukuzawa mentions that it work well for him to have 2 bicycles so that one can be left in bicycle storage while on Metro, this may work out great for you Fukuzawa but now we need to factor in the cost of a secondary bicycle for each rider, in this day and age I feel that this is a very unrealistic expectation for the average bicycling commuter, don’t get me wrong, I’d love to have 2 bicycles but my bank account and my wife would not think it’s a good idea to do so.

    Honestly I feel the suggestion of 2 bicycles along with bicycle storage is pretty ridiculous for the average person. On to the survey…

    p.s. critical mass is tomorrow, wilshire and western metro station @ 6:30pm, rolling out at 7:30pm, bike it up folks!

  3. I’m in Portland about once a month, and as you know there are a lot of bicycle users there.

    I have never seen an issue with there being too many bikes so that it interferes with other users. I don’t really foresee a HUGE increase in bikes on peak hour trains.

    I think you’re making a mountain out of a mole hill.

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  5. the great thing about too many people on the train is that metro can just run more trains! Getting people out of their cars is a good thing. Period. I don’t think this will cause a huge surge in bikes on trains, but it will make it so people don’t have to be criminals to ride their bike to work if they happen to commute during peak hours, hopefully encouraging more transit AND bike ridership.

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