Scenes from the Skirball Bridge demolition

Looking east, sparks can be seen from the span over the I-405’s northbound lanes. Sparks result from a worker cutting steel reinforcements (rebar) under the bridge deck. Photo by Josh Southwick.

Looking east, sparks can be seen from the span over the I-405’s northbound lanes. Sparks result from a worker cutting steel reinforcements (rebar) under the bridge deck. Photo by Josh Southwick.

Under a misting sky, I-405 Sepulveda Pass Improvements project contractors pounded and tore at the north side of Skirball Center Dr bridge in the early hours Wednesday, until the span over the northbound I-405 highway had been hauled away.

One of three bridges to be demolished and reconstructed—the Sunset and Mulholland bridges are the others—the Skirball bridge will be wider and longer when rebuilt. It must be reconstructed so that it can span the new high-occupancy vehicle lane to be added to the northbound lanes of the busy highway.

More photos after the jump.

While a vehicle speeds south, the hoe ram punches at the north façade. Water trucks on the bridge spray water on the work area to reduce dust. Concrete from the bridge will be crushed on the project crusher sites and reused in the project. Photo by Peter Watkinson.

While a vehicle speeds south, the hoe ram punches at the north façade. Water trucks on the bridge spray water on the work area to reduce dust. Concrete from the bridge will be crushed on the project crusher sites and reused in the project. Photo by Peter Watkinson.

To create less of an effect on regional traffic, the Skirball bridge will be demolished in two phases. Once the north side of the bridge has been rebuilt—in approximately seven months—the south side of the bridge will be demolished and rebuilt.

Above the hoe ram, a net of rebar looks almost ready to fall. Rebar from the bridge will be sold and recycled. Photo by Peter Watkinson.

Above the hoe ram, a net of rebar looks almost ready to fall. Rebar from the bridge will be sold and recycled. Photo by Peter Watkinson.

The I-405 Sepulveda Pass Improvements project is scheduled to be complete in 2013.

A worker cuts rebar while a hoe ram pounds at the north façade of the bridge. The cells of the bridge, that had been hidden for more than half a century, are now visible to the center and right of the photo. Photo by Josh Southwick.

A worker cuts rebar while a hoe ram pounds at the north façade of the bridge. The cells of the bridge, that had been hidden for more than half a century, are now visible to the center and right of the photo. Photo by Josh Southwick.

4 thoughts on “Scenes from the Skirball Bridge demolition

  1. Thank you for posting these pics! As a regular traveler of the Sepulveda Pass section of the 405, it’s interesting to see the work close-up instead of zooming by in my car. Keep ‘em comin’!

  2. We greatly appreciate the extra effort you all are making to keep us informed of progress on this incredibly complex project. We especially appreciate your daily updates on traffic impacts through the I-405 site and nixle. Thanks for also sending updates via twitter and facebook. You all are doing a wonderful job – please keep up the good work!

  3. Photos are great; we come by there for school every day and the kids and I are fascinated by the changes each day!

    Well done for keeping us all informed!

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